parental role

A resource for professionals providing antenatal education and support to fathers.

The National Parenting Strategy has one clear purpose: to act as a vehicle for valuing, equipping and supporting parents to be the best that they can be so that they, in turn, can give the children and young people of Scotland the best start in life.

Paper that presents the first UK estimates of the association between parental wealth during adolescence and a range of children’s outcomes in early adulthood.

Parental wealth is positively associated with all outcomes examined (which include educational attainment, employment, earnings and homeownership).

Paper for those who would like to become more involved in running Sure Start Children’s Centres, such as community groups, on behalf of a local authority. It is also for local authorities and anyone who uses or is involved in running children’s centres.

Document which is part of a series that summarises key findings from the sixth sweep of the study, which was collected in 2010/11 when children in the birth cohort were aged almost 6 years old.

It is one of two summaries which presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study report 'Early experiences of Primary School'.

Childhood obesity and low physical activity both have serious implications for children’s health. This report had twin objectives: to explore determinants of both obesity and low physical activity in young children. Included in the investigation of obesity is an assessment of whether it is linked to low physical activity.

The report also examined the extent to which mothers were aware of their child being overweight or obese and whether they were concerned by this.

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.

Health – specifically health inequality – is a hugely significant factor in social mobility. This briefing looks at how health inequalities continue to undermine social mobility.

Attendance has been steadily improving in the last few years, but there were still 57 million days of school missed in 2009/2010. The evidence shows that children with poor attendance are unlikely to succeed academically and they are more likely not to be in education, employment or training (NEET) when they leave school.

This report examines the trends in school attendance, parental sanctions and effective school practice.