parent-child relations

Conduct disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders in children and may persist into adulthood in about 50% of cases. The costs to society are high and impact many public sector agencies.

Parenting programmes have been shown to positively affect child behaviour, but little is known about their potential long-term cost-effectiveness.

This report estimates the costs of and longer-term savings from evidence-based parenting programmes for the prevention of persistent conduct disorder.

Report that examines how typical childcare costs and the public support available to pay for them have evolved since 2006-07.

It then looks at the level of public financial support available by 2015-16, on current plans, and combines that with the likely path of childcare costs to that date.

An update to Family Lives' October 2010 report, exploring an issue that has been a growing trend on helpline over the past few years: family’s experience of aggression in children. This report seeks once again to highlight this under-reported issue, adding new statistics.

Resource that provides audio, video and interactive technology to assist in exploring parental substance misuse, its effects on children and parenting capacity and the implications for social work practitioners.

York Consulting was commissioned by Action for Children to undertake research to articulate how Action for Children professionals develop effective relationships with vulnerable parents and how this makes a difference for children and young people.

The focus of the research was to develop a skills framework that would define the key aspects of effective professional relationships and the competencies required to achieve them.

Briefing that shows that schools which succeed in engaging children and improving behaviour for the long term respond to their pupils’ needs by offering an authoritative approach to discipline which addresses the underlying causes of bad behaviour, which often lie in problems at home.

Interim report that evaluates the first year of implementation and aims to: capture learning about how to implement the 'Think child, think parent, think family' guide; and evaluate early indications of the impact of implementing the guidance in a local area.

Paper that argues strongly that the government is correct to take the bold step of embracing the firm evidence on child development in seeking to create a strategy that "sets out plans to support a culture where the key aspects of good parenting are widely understood and where all parents can benefit from advice and support...what is needed is a much wider culture change towards recognising the importance of parenting, and how society can support mothers and fathers to give their children the best start in life".

Study based on data from the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) and the British Cohort Study (BCS). The MCS is a longitudinal study of children which initially sampled almost 19,000 new births across the UK in the early 2000s, with follow-ups at 9 months, 3 years, 5 years and 7 years. The BCS is a longitudinal study of all individuals born in Great Britain in a particular week in April 1970, which has surveyed them at various points throughout their lives, the latest at age 38 in 2008.

Results of a survey conducted by the Every Child Matters (EDCM) campaign in partnership with the Family Fund on families with disabled children and their experiences of childcare and employment.