parent-child relations

Report on the concept of parent champions for childcare pilot schemes, examining who these champions might be, how to recruit them, training, activities and remunerations.

Report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child that summarises the most current and reliable scientific research on the impact of relationships on all aspects of a child's development, and identifies ways to strengthen policies that affect those relationships in the early childhood years.

The aim of this evaluation was to measure the effectiveness of play@home in meeting its key programme outcomes (for babies, toddlers and pre-school age children) namely, improved:

- physical activity and motor skills
- cognitive and social development
- parent-child bonding.

play@home is a physical activity promotion programme for children from birth to five years which promotes interaction and loving touch to encourage bonding between parent and child. It has been developed on the philosophy that parents and carers are children's first educators.

Report with a focus on parenting from babyhood to early childhood. It brings together and examines research from a variety of disciplines to address the following questions:

- Why is parenting important in the early years?
- What is good parenting in the early years?
- What are the determinants of parenting in the early years, and is it who you are or what you do that is important?

A consortium research centre based at The University of Edinburgh. CRFR produces, stimulates and disseminates social research on families and relationships across the lifecourse.

Online publication for all those interested in the way children grow up and how they are nurtured. It welcomes contributions from parents, foster parents, residential child care workers in children’s homes, day care workers, social workers, teachers, youth workers, youth mentors, child therapists, social pedadogues, and educateurs, and all people who reflect on their own upbringing.

The journal is electronically archived at the British Library is not an academic publication though academic submissions are welcomed and considered for publication alongside all other submissions.

Paper for those who would like to become more involved in running Sure Start Children’s Centres, such as community groups, on behalf of a local authority. It is also for local authorities and anyone who uses or is involved in running children’s centres.

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.