parent-child relations

In this report, Barnardo's is asking for children to be identified when a parent is sentenced to prison so that they can receive the practical and emotional support they need as soon as possible. The organisation is calling on the Ministry of Justice to appoint a Minister to look after the needs of children afffected by parental imprisonment and to deliver a National Action Plan to ensure that this large and vulnerable group of children are recognised.

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Families share stories of how they overcame obstacles to get the best outcomes for their disabled children. This parent leadership development programme collates and distributes these important experiences so that parents can inspire each other into action and benefit from each other's experiences 24/7.

Report which identifies that as many as 40 per cent of children lack secure bonds, and there is particular concern for the 15 per cent who actively resist their parent. It recommends more support for good parenting and attachment by health visitors and children’s centres, with evidence-based interventions for those identified as higher risk.

Strategy that is built on the views of children and young people, parents and carers, the play sector and others involved in their wellbeing. Together with the action plan it seeks to improve the play experiences of all children and young people, including those with disabilities or from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Briefing on the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, which is one of a series of briefing papers produced by NHS Health Scotland on parenting programmes currently used in Scotland. These are intended as a source of information for the early years workforce, providing an overview of the programme and supporting evidence. This workforce includes those working in local authority, health and voluntary sectors and those commissioning services.

Briefing on the Incredible Years (IY) Programme, which is one of a series of briefing papers produced by NHS Health Scotland on parenting programmes currently used in Scotland. These are intended as a source of information for the early years workforce, providing an overview of the programme and supporting evidence. This workforce includes those working in local authority, health and voluntary sectors and those commissioning services.

Report that investigated whether there were indeed differences in early years’ experiences between Scotland and England, and between the three ‘city regions’ of Merseyside, Greater Manchester and Glasgow and the Clyde Valley (GCV), that might partly account for the poorer health status of Scotland, and these areas.

It drew on four cohort studies of children, born in Britain in 1946, 1958, 1970 and 2000, supplemented by analyses of routine data and other large scale surveys.

Report that aims not to establish one perfect model, but to identify the common strengths and barriers encountered by practitioners in local approaches to parental substance use. It focuses on both alcohol and drugs, as the emphasis is on children 
and local practice rather than the differences between individual substances.