family relations

Report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child that summarises the most current and reliable scientific research on the impact of relationships on all aspects of a child's development, and identifies ways to strengthen policies that affect those relationships in the early childhood years.

A consortium research centre based at The University of Edinburgh. CRFR produces, stimulates and disseminates social research on families and relationships across the lifecourse.

Report that seeks to understand further the role of grandparents in providing child care for grandchildren and the impact on wellbeing (child and adult).

Booklet to help a child and trusted adult to talk together about what is happening in their life. It is written for children, but at the end of each section is a part written for adults.

It is for children who live in all sorts of families - those living with relatives, children in care, those who have a parent in prison, or worried about a parent or carer drinking too much.

This report puts the national statistics about children and young people’s emotional wellbeing and mental health into context, and tells the stories of some typical young Relate clients. It also presents the evidence that emotional and mental distress in childhood and adolescence matter in both the short and long term, and that they can be ameliorated by the right services being easily available. Recommendations are also made for the provision of these services.

The study was funded by The Big Lottery and was conducted on a partnership basis by CHILDREN 1ST (who had overall management responsibility) and the Glasgow Centre for the Child & Society, University of Strathclyde. A final report of the study entitled, 'Fathers of Children Born to Teenage Mothers: A Study of Processes within Changing Family Formation Practices'. The study began in August 2006 and finished in November 2009.

Paper highlighting the scale of the problem of runaway young people in Scotland, describing existing services in place to deal with the issue and recommending a national strategy be devised to tackle the problem more effectively.

Summary of a report into the problem of runaway young people outlining the research methods used and the conclusions reached.

Qualitative study that the DCSF commissioned Newcastle University and the Family and Parenting Institute to undertake. Issues identified include enhancing the understanding of how adults form and manage relationships; the relationship support needs of adults in different personal circumstances, and in a variety of relationship types; and to gather evidence which can guide the development of new policy initiatives to support adult couple relationships.

Report presenting the findings of a follow-up study to support the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence/Social Care Institute for Excellence guidance on parenting programmes. It also provides some background to the study and reviews what is already known about the factors which increase the likelihood of uptake and completion of parenting programmes.