families

Despite poverty and social exclusion being common characteristics of families involved in the child protection system and a key factor associated with children becoming looked after, there is evidence to suggest that professionals struggle to truly incorporate an understanding of the impact of poverty in their assessments and interventions. In practice social workers and other professionals continue to have difficulty in making sense of the complex interplay between poverty, social deprivation, parental capacity and children's development.

In 2006, Aberlour Child Care Trust and the Scottish Association of Drug and Alcohol Teams joined together to hold a second Think Tank to address the question 'Alcohol or Drugs' Does it make a difference for the Child?'. This report is entirely drawn from the Think Tank’s discussions and represents the knowledge and views of experienced managers, practitioners and researchers. It does not include evidence from research or the content of policy and guidance documents.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. Anorexia, bulimia, binging and compulsive eating can blight people’s lives. This booklet describes the signs of eating distress, explains possible causes and looks at the kinds of treatment available. It aims to help anyone who thinks they themselves, a friend, or a member of their family, may have a problem of this kind.

In the Borders there are an estimated 1,306 children and young people affected by substance misuse within the family. The Borders Drug & Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) has, over recent years, become increasingly aware of concerns around the impact of parental drug and alcohol misuse on children and young people. Assessing this problem has been a very complex process, and due to the varying levels of awareness and activity between agencies, has been impossible to determine exact numbers of children and families affected in this way.

This review of the available research will address the definition and extent of parental problem drinking; its impact across important dimensions of children’s lives; the impact on children as they become adults; and some messages for practice, including a suggested service specification. The research focus is mainly on UK studies published in the last two decades, supplemented by research from other countries, especially the USA, Australia and Europe.

This resource is a guide for Connexions workers and staff working with young people in transition. Connexions is the government's support service for all young people aged 13 to 19 in England. It brings together all the services and support young people need during their teenage years offering differentiated and integrated support to young people through Personal Advisers (PAs).

Research on families involved with child protection services in the United Kingdom reveal that many the families all share the common experiences of living on a low income, suffering housing difficulties, and social isolation. The children and families experiencing these factors may often feel that they have few choices available to help them. This learning object explores the complex issues that often surround these children and families.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This factsheet is primarily for professionals and students and members of the South Asian communities in Britain. Much of the information will also be useful for mental health service users and carers.

Parenting has increasingly become the focus for policy and academic debate. The racial and cultural heterogeneity of British society also invites considerable attention to many aspects of the lives of minority ethnic families. Yet, there is little empirical evidence into ethnicity, parenting and family life. This study, by Ravinder Barn at Royal Holloway, University of London, explores the views and experiences of 'ordinary' parents to increase our understanding in some key areas, including family support, education, child discipline and the process of acculturation.

There is increasing enthusiasm, both in government and in the community, for improving child outcomes through parenting programmes. This drive encompasses the ‘Surestart’ and ‘Respect’ agendas, and emphasises the importance of children’s centres and school-based support. However, many programmes have failed to work when rigorously tested. This study examines factors which influence programme effectiveness in poor, ethnically diverse areas.