families

Briefing for family carers supporting a child with severe learning disabilities and behaviour described as challenging. It will help people understand what to expect from local services.

Publication which has been financed by the United Nations Trust Fund on Family Activities, and provides funding support for research activities with an overall aim of promoting the objectives of the International Year of the Family. The five independent chapters were commissioned to focus on a number of relevant current international issues affecting families and the role of men in addressing them.

This paper has been developed by Family Rights Group on behalf of the Kinship Care Alliance. It sets out the current context for family and friends carers, our concerns about their circumstances and our recommendations.

Urgent action is required at national and local level in order that clear policies and systems are in place in every local authority to ensure that family and friends care arrangements are appropriately assessed and supported.

This good practice guide has been developed to assist local authorities in this task. It is informed by:

· Examples of good practice found in policies sent by local authorities in response to the FOI survey.

In 2007 Family Rights Group sent a questionnaire to all local authorities in England and Wales, under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 specifically about family and friends care.

It asked each authority to provide its policies for working with, assessing and supporting family and friends carers and the children they are raising, information on dedicated staffing and data on the numbers of children and carers assisted by legal order and budget spent (see Appendix A for the Freedom of Information questions sent to all local authorities in England and Wales).

This resource is for individuals and groups who will lead on understanding family poverty locally. It will help in providing the underpinning information and insights to develop strategies that can reduce and mitigate against child poverty.

This study examined how parents ‘teach’ young children between the age of 5 to 12 about alcohol. It explored parents’ attitudes and family drinking practices using a national survey and in-depth case study research.

This resource explores the process of planning and undertaking an assessment of needs, strengths and risks with the contribution of other professionals. A family case study is used to illustrate the opportunities and challenges of this process and to help you reflect on the skills involved in working with other professionals and with family members.

JRF's annual update, based on what members of the public think people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living.
Over time, changes in prices alter the cost of a minimum standard of living, and changes in social norms will change the 'minimum' that is required. This study considers both of these elements, and updates the budgets to April 2010.
The study reveals: