families

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

This report examines the extent to which work can contribute to the eradication of child poverty, and identifies a number of issues that necessarily arise if work is seen as the best route out of poverty. The government has repeatedly stated that work is the best route out of poverty. This implies that work is not the only route, but is the preferred or main route in tackling child poverty. This report examines the extent to which there is underemployment among parents and a desire to work among parents who are not currently working.

This booklet, produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information for parents, carers, professionals and students about those professionals who provide health, education and social services and how they can help children with Down's Syndrome.

This resource is for practitioners who work to support or may come into contact with young carers. It is not an assessment tool but a "map" for both families and agencies to follow so they can see what choices, what responsibilities and what lines of accountability for services may be available. When using the "Whole Family Pathway", practitioners should refer to the Key Principles of Practice for supporting young carers and their families.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. Many people with dementia are concerned that their disease may have been inherited and that they may pass it on to their children. Family members of people with dementia are also sometimes concerned that they might be more likely to develop dementia themselves. This information sheet outlines the present state of knowledge about the inherited risk of dementia.

Document setting out the Scottish Government's strategic approach to tackling alcohol misuse in Scotland.

The measures proposed include specific legislative action intended to bring about short term change and more general measures aimed at effecting cultural change in the long term.

Video showing the particular difficulties families can face following release from prison and highlighting the fact these are often overlooked and unexpected even though this may be when the family needs most support.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information for parents on the issues and feelings that siblings of Down's Syndrome children may have.

This guide is about delivering high quality, coordinated services to families with parents who misuse alcohol or who have mental health problems. It recognises that promoting the well-being of children and keeping them safe should be achieved, wherever possible, by providing support for parents in bringing up their children and by ensuring that children do not take on excessive or inappropriate caring roles in their family.

Parents living in poverty face a complex set of factors at individual, family and community levels that make parenting more difficult. In this learning object you will explore a case study of Selina and her family, and in so doing, gain an understanding of some of the difficult choices faced by parents in poverty, as well as support services that could help parents cope. Note: This resource contains audio.