children

Summary of the document: Getting it right for every child: proposals for action: summary of consultation analysis. The consultation document getting it right for every child: proposals for action, which was published on 21 June 2005, identified three main areas for improvement: Improving and unifying the services for children, strengthening the children’s hearings system and modernising the children’s hearings system.

This report looks at the service needs of people in rural areas following major life events spending time talking to rural service users to find out about their experiences. This work takes a practical and positive approach, looking for solutions to providing fair access to services for rural communities. This study provides an overview, synthesis and analysis of research and other evidence on ‘young carers’ and ‘young adult carers’ in the UK.

Web based presentation consisting of six Powerpoint files and four PDF files. It covers communication throughout child development and highlights useful research studies, analysis, books, tools and techniques.

Getting It Right for Every Child is an integrated system of getting the right help to children at the right time in their lives through agencies working together to provide a coherent, evidence based system of assessment, planning and recording. It aims to cut down bureaucracy and help children get the service they need when they need it. It is founded on understanding how children develop to reach their full potential and the fundamental value of children's and families' participation in assessment and planning.

Paper reviewing studies of arithmetic development in typically developing children and children with Down syndrome and concluding that further studies using larger samples of children with Down syndrome are required.

In the UK, political initiatives have encouraged the greater use of adoption as a solution to the care of children who cannot live with their birth families. This drive for 'permanence' has been welcomed by many, but has also given rise to debate. Where children have lingered uncertainly and for too long in the care system, 'permanence' is clearly the top priority. But not all children need the same solution. They may be 'children who wait', but they may not be waiting specifically for adoption.

Report of a research study conducted to assess the impact of inclusive practice on narrowing the gap in outcomes for health, safety, attainment, participation and economic well-being for children from excluded families.

This resource details Dr Barnardo's account of his first encounter with a street 'arab'.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children. This document is one of a series that summarises key findings from the second sweep of the survey which was launched in April 2006. At the second sweep, interviews were successfully completed with 4,512 respondents from the birth cohort and 2,500 from the child cohort.

This guide is an introduction to setting up groups for young refugees and provides information on why there is a need to establish groups across the UK; the substantial benefits groups can provide to young refugees; practical tips on setting up a group; group membership; group leadership and support; and key contacts and further reading.