children

In the UK, political initiatives have encouraged the greater use of adoption as a solution to the care of children who cannot live with their birth families. This drive for 'permanence' has been welcomed by many, but has also given rise to debate. Where children have lingered uncertainly and for too long in the care system, 'permanence' is clearly the top priority. But not all children need the same solution. They may be 'children who wait', but they may not be waiting specifically for adoption.

Report of a research study conducted to assess the impact of inclusive practice on narrowing the gap in outcomes for health, safety, attainment, participation and economic well-being for children from excluded families.

This resource details Dr Barnardo's account of his first encounter with a street 'arab'.

This guide is an introduction to setting up groups for young refugees and provides information on why there is a need to establish groups across the UK; the substantial benefits groups can provide to young refugees; practical tips on setting up a group; group membership; group leadership and support; and key contacts and further reading.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children. This document is one of a series that summarises key findings from the second sweep of the survey which was launched in April 2006. At the second sweep, interviews were successfully completed with 4,512 respondents from the birth cohort and 2,500 from the child cohort.

This booklet, produced by the Mental Health Foundation, is to help children and young people understand dementia. It explains how people with dementia behave and feel, it also aims to provide young people with information about the illness and how to cope with knowing someone who was dementia. There are a number of exercises in the booklet which make it ideal for use in the classroom, as part of a PSHE lesson.

In 1999, Tony Blair committed the Government to abolishing child poverty by 2020. In 2006, the Conservative opposition endorsed this aim, and in 2009 the Government introduced a Child Poverty Bill, which requires all future governments to meet four child poverty targets. This report claims that the way the Government is defining and measuring poverty is badly flawed, and that the new Bill has more to do with redistributing incomes and increasing welfare payments than with tackling the underlying causes of child poverty.

First Impressions was commissioned in early 2004, in order to look at the emotional and practical needs of families who have a small child – aged up to five – with a learning disability. This report looks at the support needed by these families, including the way in which parents are informed about their child’s learning disability. The impact on the family is examined and practical and strategic recommendations that can improve emotional and practical support for families with a young disabled child are detailed.

For more outcomes-focused resources, see the Outcomes Toolbox.

Leading for Outcomes is a series of guides that provide support and training materials to help lead the social services workforce to focus on the outcomes important to people.

Report that presents the findings from an audit and analysis of 56 Significant Case Reviews (SCRs) and 43 Initial Case Reviews (ICRs) conducted in Scotland since 2007.