children

Bulletin investigating the quality of service provided to children and young people looked after away from home in residential services such as care homes, residential special schools and secure accommodation services with regard to their mental health and well being.

Report inquiring into why the proportion of children living in poverty has risen in a majority of the world's developed economies over the past decade. It seeks to identify the factors pushing poverty rates upwards and why some OECD countries are doing a better job than others in protecting children at risk.

This Framework builds on the good work already underway across Scotland and illustrates progress with actions in support of our shared objectives.

This progress map summary includes key research findings from a C4EO knowledge review about the diverse needs of different groups of disabled children and their families, and whether services are meeting these needs. The summary includes challenge questions which can be used as tools for strategic leaders in assessing, delivering and monitoring the ways in which the needs of disabled children from differentiated groups are met.

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

Policy makers are becoming increasingly concerned with the long term consequences of childhood experiences. This concern is fuelled by the belief that the early years of life are crucial in shaping later life. Catch them young and save society trouble later on, runs the argument. Kenan Malik asks whether policies towards young children are based on reliable scientific evidence or on political claims.

This is the fourth of four volumes of comprehensive guidance on the Children (Scotland) Act 1995. The Regulations, Directions and Guidance which are included in this and the other volumes are designed to provide guidance on the implementation of Parts II, III and IV of the Act. Volume 4 contains a bibliography of relevant legislation and circulars; references relevant to the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 as a whole; and references which relate to individual parts of the Regulations and Guidance. Also included is a complete index to all four volumes.

The second programme in the series looks at the work of child psychologist Jean Piaget who believed children learned through play. Subsequent experiments allowing children to imagine different social, rather than spatial, situations have had very different results. Claudia Hammond asks how far we should rely on Piaget's findings today.

This document contains eight case examples focusing on different aspects of information sharing. These eight case examples support the cross-Government guidance document Information Sharing: Practitioners’ Guide by illustrating for practitioners the practical application of the guidance. The case examples cover a range of situations of relevance to everyone who work with children and young people, whether they are employed or volunteers, working in the public, private or voluntary sectors.