children

Document which is part of a series that summarises key findings from the sixth sweep of the study, which was collected in 2010/11 when children in the birth cohort were aged almost 6 years old.

It is one of two summaries which presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study report 'Early experiences of Primary School'.

Childhood obesity and low physical activity both have serious implications for children’s health. This report had twin objectives: to explore determinants of both obesity and low physical activity in young children. Included in the investigation of obesity is an assessment of whether it is linked to low physical activity.

The report also examined the extent to which mothers were aware of their child being overweight or obese and whether they were concerned by this.

Research demonstrates a negative relationship between worklessness and outcomes for children over and above what would be expected due to other factors, such as material deprivation and low income. This underlines the importance of supporting parents to move into the labour market.

This briefing looks at the importance of employment to social mobility.

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.

Update to 'Do the Right Thing' - the Scottish Government's 2009 response to the 2008 concluding observations from the UN committee on the Rights of the Child.

The overall aim of this report is to provide a more nuanced understanding of variation in grandparental support to grandchildren and their parents over a child’s early years in Scotland.

Report that provides a best estimate of the extent of reductions in public funding that the children’s voluntary sector can expect to see over the next five years. It takes the debate beyond the cuts, and, based on consultation with NCB’s network members, explores how children’s charities are responding and adapting to austerity measures and the barriers they face to doing so.

Finally, it offers recommendations for what can be done to ensure that children, young people and families – and the statutory sector – can continue to benefit from a thriving charity sector.

The NSPCC is calling on central and local government to address the risks for children returning home from care. They must improve performance, eliminate variations in practice across local authorities, and increase the support provided to children and their parents. Taken together, these measures could ensure that returns home are successful and that all children are protected from harm.

Assessment that examines the effect that welfare reforms introduced since 2010 has had on children’s right to a decent standard of living and the potential effects of proposed changes within the Welfare Reform Bill 2012.