children

The aim of this study is to provide evidence of the impact of safeguarding peer reviews for local authorities who are in intervention.

In particular, the study:

Small scale qualitative research to respond to and enhance understandings of the complex nature of sexting and the role of mobile technologies within peer teen networks. It was designed as a pilot study – to investigate a phenomenon whose nature, scale and dimensions were unknown.

Thus the research itself also was small in scale and exploratory in nature and also culturally and geographically specific.

Research shows that poor maternal mental health and low income during babyhood affect children's outcomes negatively and are factors in the creation of future generations of "Troubled Families". Early intervention services to improve children's life chances must therefore mean intervening before at-risk babies are born, and in the first year of life; providing both services which support vulnerable mothers emotionally and with parenting; and providing adequate welfare support.

Document which is part of a series that summarises key findings from the sixth sweep of the study, which was collected in 2010/11 when children in the birth cohort were aged almost 6 years old.

It is one of two summaries which presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study report 'Early experiences of Primary School'.

Childhood obesity and low physical activity both have serious implications for children’s health. This report had twin objectives: to explore determinants of both obesity and low physical activity in young children. Included in the investigation of obesity is an assessment of whether it is linked to low physical activity.

The report also examined the extent to which mothers were aware of their child being overweight or obese and whether they were concerned by this.

Research demonstrates a negative relationship between worklessness and outcomes for children over and above what would be expected due to other factors, such as material deprivation and low income. This underlines the importance of supporting parents to move into the labour market.

This briefing looks at the importance of employment to social mobility.

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.

Update to 'Do the Right Thing' - the Scottish Government's 2009 response to the 2008 concluding observations from the UN committee on the Rights of the Child.

The overall aim of this report is to provide a more nuanced understanding of variation in grandparental support to grandchildren and their parents over a child’s early years in Scotland.