vulnerable children

This study is one of a series of projects, jointly commissioned by the DCSF and the Department of Health, to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and focuses on recognition of neglect. This literature review aimed to provide a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how those signals are recognised and responded to and whether response could be swifter.

This paper highlights the key findings related to welfare services of a one-year research project commissioned by the Countryside Agency and Save the Children exploring service provision for children who experience domestic violence in rural areas in England. The project involved in-depth interviews with children, young people and a small sample of parents as well as service providers in the education, health, social services, refuge, housing and criminal justice sectors.

Factsheet that explains why children and young people may want to seek help and what prevents them from asking for it. It offers advice to organisations on how to encourage children to ask for help and support.

Children and young people in Scotland continue to live in run-down, overcrowded, damp housing or are stuck in temporary housing affecting all aspects of their current and future lives. This report presents an overview of the bad housing and homelessness situation in Scotland.

This paper highlights the key housing-related findings of a one-year research project commissioned by the Countryside Agency and Save the Children exploring service provision for children who experience domestic violence in rural areas in England. The project involved in-depth interviews with children, young people and a small sample of parents as well as service providers in the housing education, health, social services, refuge, and criminal justice sectors.

This learning object provides an introduction to the assessment framework in which Norma Baldwin discusses the origins, nature and key features of the Integrated Assessment Framework. Norma currently teaches child care and protection at Dundee University's Faculty of Education and Social Work. Her extensive research into community development approaches to child protection has influenced policy development throughout the UK. Norma has also conducted developmental and evaluative work on services in a number of local authorities.

This review identified research studies on the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for disabled children with behavioural problems. The findings on intervention outcomes are discussed in the broad areas of interventions on behaviour management skills only; interventions on behaviour management skills and the parent-child relationships; interventions on behaviour management and teaching skills; interventions on behaviour management skills and understanding the condition; and an overview of the significant effects for each intervention.

Drinking alcohol is very common. For most people, it is an enjoyable part of a party or going out with friends. Most people who drink do not have a drink problem. However, for some children and young people who call ChildLine, alcohol does cause problems. This can be because they are drinking too much. More commonly though, it is because someone they care about – a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, girlfriend, boyfriend or a friend – is drinking too much. For these callers, alcohol is a problem. This is called alcohol abuse.

This document sets out the rules applying to the Children's Hearings System by law. Extracts from the Children (Scotland) Act 1995; Children’s Hearings (Scotland) Rules 1996; and the Children’s Hearings (Legal Representation) (Scotland) Rules 2002.

Following the tragic death of three year old Kennedy McFarlane on the 17th of May 2000, Dumfries and Galloway Child Protection Committee (CPC) commissioned an immediate inquiry into the circumstances which led up to her fatal injury. The object of this inquiry is not to apportion blame but to learn lessons which will help to protect children from abuse and neglect in the future. Also known as The Hammond Report.