vulnerable children

Report that builds on existing knowledge about levels of running away. The estimated 100,000 children who run away each year in the UK are, to varying degrees, in need of support and services. Although there is no single profile for a child who runs way, there are common services and approaches that can provide support before, during and after a running away incident. Stepping Up reviews these services and how far the current policy provisions ensure that every child who runs away is adequately safeguarded.

This report on the consultation "Safe and secure homes for our most vulnerable children" accompanies Insight 30 and provides a robust analysis of all responses using both quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.

This is the outcome of an extensive review of evidence about the effectiveness of interventions designed to tackle children and young people's involvement in gun and knife crime. It discusses predicting who is most likely to be involved in violent crime, the impact of where children and young people live on their involvement, how young people's relationships, perceptions and choices affect involvement, anti-gun and anti-knife interventions, and youth offending and youth violence research, ending with conclusions.

This briefing focuses on other therapies or measures to help children and young people who deliberately self-harm (DSH). The aim of the therapy is either to reduce the amount they self harm or to stop them self-harming completely. The population covered by this briefing are children and adolescents up to the age of 19 who live in the community. The characteristics of self-harm, and the psychological and psychosocial factors associated with self-harm among children and adolescents are covered in a previous briefing in this series.

In the Borders there are an estimated 1,306 children and young people affected by substance misuse within the family. The Borders Drug & Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) has, over recent years, become increasingly aware of concerns around the impact of parental drug and alcohol misuse on children and young people. Assessing this problem has been a very complex process, and due to the varying levels of awareness and activity between agencies, has been impossible to determine exact numbers of children and families affected in this way.

Certain types of charity are set up to assist or care for those who are particularly vulnerable, perhaps because of their age, physical or mental ability or ill health.

Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity are not harmed in any way through contact with it. They have a legal duty to act prudently and this means that they must take all reasonable steps within their power to ensure that this does not happen.

The role of GPs in safeguarding children has long been seen as vital to inter-agency collaboration in child protection processes and to promoting early intervention in families. It has often been characterized as problematic to engage GPs and recognized that potential conflicts of interest may constrain their engagement.

This guidance is for police, health, social services, education and all other agencies and professionals that may work with children about whom there are concerns that they are involved in prostitution. It sets out an inter-agency approach, based on local protocols developed within the framework of Working Together to Safeguard Children (Department of Health et al, 1999; National Assembly for Wales, 2000), to address this type of abuse.