vulnerable children

The framework is intended to be used by local agencies as a planning and audit tool, to identify goals and milestones for continuous improvement in the delivery of services and approaches to support and improve the mental health of children and young people in Scotland.

Brief power-point presentation that gives an overview of important points of historical reference in our understanding of and approach to children and their treatment.

It concludes with reference to two important current legislative and policy contexts – the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and The Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

First in a series of lectures designed to honour the memory and achievement of Lord Kilbrandon, who wrote one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'.

The lecture concentrates on the system of juvenile justice.

A growing number of children are affected by parental substance misuse, and policy and practice increasingly recognise the need to tackle the problems that this causes. Currently, the needs of older children are less well known or addressed. This study explores the experiences of 38 young people, aged 15–27 years, who had at least one parent with a drug or alcohol problem.

Bullying does not only happen in normal school hours, it can happen anywhere. Children who are badly bullied in school are more likely than others to be bullied outside of it too. This guidance is aimed at managers, staff and volunteers in youth activities, clubs and groups – including local authority and third sector providers, and voluntary management committees. It outlines the possible bullying that might occur in youth activities and describes steps to prevent it and respond to it effectively.

This is an introduction to significant legislation in the field of child care other than The Children (Scotland) Act 1995. It is the third in a series of sessions in this resource which can be used together. The first two dealt with children’s rights and Children (Scotland) Act 1995. They have been re-structured for independent use, but can still be used in sequence. The final session deals with (social work) departmental procedure (this could be adapted for use by other agencies).This section is a trainer input via a Powerpoint presentation with handouts.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.