vulnerable children

A growing number of children are affected by parental substance misuse, and policy and practice increasingly recognise the need to tackle the problems that this causes. Currently, the needs of older children are less well known or addressed. This study explores the experiences of 38 young people, aged 15–27 years, who had at least one parent with a drug or alcohol problem.

Bullying does not only happen in normal school hours, it can happen anywhere. Children who are badly bullied in school are more likely than others to be bullied outside of it too. This guidance is aimed at managers, staff and volunteers in youth activities, clubs and groups – including local authority and third sector providers, and voluntary management committees. It outlines the possible bullying that might occur in youth activities and describes steps to prevent it and respond to it effectively.

This is an introduction to significant legislation in the field of child care other than The Children (Scotland) Act 1995. It is the third in a series of sessions in this resource which can be used together. The first two dealt with children’s rights and Children (Scotland) Act 1995. They have been re-structured for independent use, but can still be used in sequence. The final session deals with (social work) departmental procedure (this could be adapted for use by other agencies).This section is a trainer input via a Powerpoint presentation with handouts.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

The government made a commitment in the 1998 White Paper 'Modernising Social Services' to put in place new arrangements to commission from all of its Chief Inspectors of services involved with children a joint report on children’s safeguards.

This is the first of those reports and draws on the findings of a wide range of inspection activity undertaken by individual inspectorates. In addition, a joint inspection was undertaken to address inter-agency arrangements for safeguarding children.

This publication is a companion volume to the Guidance on the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. It is a significant contribution to a major programme of work led by the Department of Health to provide guidance, practice materials and training resources on assessing children in need and their families.

This is a short training scenario originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. The scenario is: Ellie and her partner are prescribed methadone. Their care of their children is causing concern.