vulnerable children

Report that aims to provide information and evidence to support the development of services for young people experiencing problems due to their own problematic drugs and/or substance misuse.

The guide focuses on the needs of drug action teams (DATs) in their role as commissioners of services as well as the direct delivery of services. The report includes definitions of the target client group and their needs; discusses key principles underpinning effective services and explores the key issues to address in delivering services.

Save the Children's recent research estimates that 90,000 children in Scotland live in severe poverty. Douglas Hamilton, Head of Policy and Research, will provide an overview of Save the Children's recent work in this area focussing on the Poverty Premium and access to services. He will also draw attention to some of the policy and practice changes that Save the Children are calling for. Professor Bob Holman, anti-poverty campaigner and community worker, will respond to Douglas' paper focusing on the impact that inequality has on the lives of Scotland's children.

The Kilbrandon report was, and still remains, one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'. Though it is now over thirty years since it was first published, current debate about child care practices and polices in Scotland still resonates with principles and philosophies derived from the Kilbrandon Report itself.

The Government is committed to improving the protection during the criminal justice process for vulnerable or intimidated witnesses, including children. This document is issued as part of ‘Action for Justice’, the implementation programme for the ‘Speaking Up for Justice’ report. Following the report, the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 set out a range of special measures to assist vulnerable or intimidated witnesses, including children to give their best evidence in criminal proceedings.

This is the report of a Think Tank on the impact of parental drug and alcohol use. The Think Tank was drawn together by Aberlour Child Care Trust from commissioners, managers, practitioners and researchers working in health, education, social work, criminal justice and drugs and alcohol services across Scotland.

This exercise is designed to prompt participants to ‘surface’ the beliefs and values that underlie their reactions to the situations that children are in. This exercise is usually carried out with a large group split into smaller groups of 4 – 5 people. It lasts approximately 90 minutes.

This guidance has been developed for practitioners in Newcastle working with children and families and/or adults who have care of children where substance misuse is a factor, which affects their lives. It has been produced in response to the increasing problem of substance misuse and particularly the rising number of children who are referred into the child protection arena due to parental substance misuse.

This is Dumfries and Galloway Council's response to the Hammond Report which formed the Inquiry into the Circumstances Surrounding the Death of Kennedy McFarlane. This Report reviews the recommendations of the Inquiry and sets out planned action.

Introduction to a guidance pack intended to provide information and advice on some of the pressures that vulnerable children face in society and offer alternative routes to prevent damaging behaviour and negative outcomes such as self-harm, substance misuse, sexual exploitation through prostitution and running away.

This online guide suggests some simple steps that can be taken to make children safer, and to understand better how and why people sexually abuse children and how we can stop them.

It includes information on: who are the abusers?, how do abusers control children?, how do abusers keep children from telling?, what makes children vulnerable? and leaving children in the care of others; hints and tips; talking with your children; children out and about; and what to do if you suspect abuse.