vulnerable children

A small booklet designed primarily for women, although it recognises that men experience domestic violence too. It acknowledges women's fears and encourages them to seek help for themselves and their children. It helps women to understand the impact of domestic violence on their children and encourages them to move on from a position of feeling powerless to being able to take action to improve the situation.

This resource vividly describes the situation of many children and young people living in substance misusing households.

Paper summarising the findings of a study which followed 2,500 women over two years across seven sites in England and Wales who were suffering from severe physical, emotional and sexual abuse as well as stalking and harassment. It also makes four recommendations for giving choices back to those suffering abuse and using existing resources to best effect.

The children's hearings system, Scotland's unique system of juvenile justice, commenced operating on 15 April 1971. The system is centred on the welfare of the child. A fundamental principle is that the needs of the child should be the key test and that children who offend and children who are in need of care and protection should be dealt with in the same system. Cases relating to children who may require compulsory measures of intervention are considered by an independent panel of trained lay people.

The manifesto sets out a plan of action based on the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry®, ‘A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age’, which stimulated a major national debate about how the nation treats its young people. The manifesto identifies three key areas in which political leaders must act to improve childhood now and for future generations, and calls for every political party to write these pledges into their manifestos.

These materials are intended to support teachers and pupils through their learning about the Children’s Hearings system.

Report that aims to provide information and evidence to support the development of services for young people experiencing problems due to their own problematic drugs and/or substance misuse.

The guide focuses on the needs of drug action teams (DATs) in their role as commissioners of services as well as the direct delivery of services. The report includes definitions of the target client group and their needs; discusses key principles underpinning effective services and explores the key issues to address in delivering services.

Save the Children's recent research estimates that 90,000 children in Scotland live in severe poverty. Douglas Hamilton, Head of Policy and Research, will provide an overview of Save the Children's recent work in this area focussing on the Poverty Premium and access to services. He will also draw attention to some of the policy and practice changes that Save the Children are calling for. Professor Bob Holman, anti-poverty campaigner and community worker, will respond to Douglas' paper focusing on the impact that inequality has on the lives of Scotland's children.

The Kilbrandon report was, and still remains, one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'. Though it is now over thirty years since it was first published, current debate about child care practices and polices in Scotland still resonates with principles and philosophies derived from the Kilbrandon Report itself.

The Government is committed to improving the protection during the criminal justice process for vulnerable or intimidated witnesses, including children. This document is issued as part of ‘Action for Justice’, the implementation programme for the ‘Speaking Up for Justice’ report. Following the report, the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 set out a range of special measures to assist vulnerable or intimidated witnesses, including children to give their best evidence in criminal proceedings.