vulnerable children

Report that identifies current practice in five anonymous Scottish local government case studies in their approaches to implementing austerity measures and considers the extent to which they recognise and seek to manage the resulting social risks to vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. 

Paper that is an overview of an analysis of the Vulnerable and Disadvantaged Client Access Strategies (Access Strategies) in Australia, a requirement of service providers funded by the Family Support Program (FSP).

Organisations were asked to document and implement the steps they would take to improve service accessibility and responsiveness for vulnerable and disadvantaged families, including Indigenous families.

Paper that explores the concepts of adversity, risk, vulnerability and resilience in the context of child protection systems with the aim of contributing to the debate about the ways in which risk of ‘harm’ and ‘abuse’ are conceptualised at different stages of the lifespan and in relation to different groups of people.

Research report for Action for Children, The Children's Society and NSPCC.

The research set out to:
• measure the number of families with children in Britain who are most vulnerable to adverse economic conditions, using a number of different definitions of ‘vulnerability’; and
• estimate how these families will be affected over the next few years by the changes to tax and benefits, cuts to public services and the on-going effects of the post-2008 economic downturn.

Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social care trusts in Northern Ireland have introduced ‘therapeutic approaches’ in a number of children’s homes, and in the regional secure units, with the aim of improving staff skills and outcomes for young people. This At a glance briefing summarises an evaluation of the approaches conducted between May 2010 and February 2012. The full details can be found in SCIE Report 58 (Macdonald et al, 2012). Summary published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Children and young people in care are some of the most vulnerable in society. A small but significant proportion of looked-after children across the UK are cared for in residential settings such as children's homes. Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social Care (HSC) Trusts in Northern Ireland introduced 'therapeutic approaches' in a number of children's homes and in the regional secure units. This report gives the results of an evaluation of these approaches. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Paper that discusses some of the practical and theoretical implications of the utilisation of the concept of ‘vulnerability’ in contemporary social policy. The analysis questions how far a seemingly protective and therapeutic emphasis on vulnerability has more stigmatising and exclusive effects.

Includem's YouTube channel of video resources. Includem is a specialist voluntary organisation that provides 24/7 one-to-one support to Scotland's most vulnerable young people.

Based on extensive research, consultation and original analysis, this report adds new dimensions to the case for early intervention.

It shines a light on the disproportionate vulnerability of babies to abuse and neglect; and it provides the first estimates of the numbers of babies affected by parental problems of substance misuse, mental illness and domestic abuse.

Scoping review that explores levels of intended and unintended exposure to specific risks; the impact of harm suffered by children; and the characteristics of children who may be at highest risk.