school children

This resource vividly describes the situation of many children and young people living in substance misusing households.

This edition of 'How good is our school?' replaces that published in 1996. It is designed, as were the earlier editions, to help headteachers and teachers in school self-evaluation and to assist education authority officials in discharging their responsibilities for quality assurance. The continuing strength of this set of quality indicators is that it is used in external evaluation by HM Inspectors as well as in self-evaluation by schools and by local authorities in quality assurance procedures.

This report sets out the government response to the findings and recommendations of the Cullen Inquiry following the shootings at Dunblane Primary School by Thomas Hamilton on 13 March 1996. Comment is made on: recommendations on the certification system relating to Section 1 firearms; police powers and the legal responsibilities of licensed gun or firearms clubs; restriction of the availability of Section 1 firearms and amendment of existing firearms legislation accordingly.

Strategy document setting out the UK Government's ambitions for children and young people's health and well-being in England and outlining how progress towards these will be made through improving outcomes, services and experiences of service use and reducing health inequalities.

This report sets out the findings of the Cullen Inquiry following the shootings at Dunblane Primary School by Thomas Hamilton on 13 March 1996. The aim of the Inquiry was to clarify the exact circumstances leading up to and surrounding the incident, and to provide recommendations to safeguard the public against the misuse of firearms and other issues raised by the investigation.

Key recommendations include improved school security; the certification of firearms; and the vetting and supervision of adults working with children.

Information on the advice given to local authorities in 2003 from the Scottish Government.

The guidelines include the rights and responsibilities of pupils and parents.

This resource looks at the UK education system. On January 15th 2004 a dozen film crews from the BBC in Bristol went out across the length and breadth of the country to capture a day in the life of education. Each crew followed a single person over their normal day.

Bullying does not only happen in normal school hours, it can happen anywhere. Children who are badly bullied in school are more likely than others to be bullied outside of it too. This guidance is aimed at managers, staff and volunteers in youth activities, clubs and groups – including local authority and third sector providers, and voluntary management committees. It outlines the possible bullying that might occur in youth activities and describes steps to prevent it and respond to it effectively.

Research briefing that summarises what is currently known about the nature and extent of bullying in schools, looking at the factors that drive such behaviour, and what makes some young people more vulnerable to being bullied than others.

How can homophobic bullying be stopped? It is estimated that there are 60,000 lesbians and gay teenagers subjected to homophobic bullying at any one time. Gay rights charity, Stonewall, has launched a campaign called Education for All which highlights the problems of this type of bullying in schools. Jenni hears from a lesbian who endured bullying at school for many years.

She also finds out what is being done to eradicate this neglected aspect of bullying and why despite government guidelines, schools still don't seem to know how to deal with this problem.