school children

Impact of paid adult support on the participation and learning of pupils in mainstream schools

To date, no systematic review of international literature has been conducted that has focused on the key question of whether and how support staff in classrooms have an impact on pupils' learning and participation in schools and classrooms. Put simply, is there evidence that pupils learn and participate more effectively in mainstream schools when support staff are present in classrooms? This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2003.

Systematic review of pedagogical approaches that can effectively include children with special educational needs in mainstream classrooms with a particular focus on peer group interactive approaches

There is a statutory requirement on mainstream schools to provide effective learning opportunities for all pupils by setting suitable learning challenges, responding to pupils' diverse learning needs and overcoming potential barriers to learning and assessment. While research has sought to establish the effectiveness of particular pedagogies or the impact of school actions on pupil participation, there has been no prior systematic review that can answer the question of which pedagogical approaches can effectively include children with SEN aged 7-14 in mainstream classrooms.

Systematic review of how theories explain learning behaviour in school contexts

This systematic review was commissioned by the Teacher Training Agency in order to contribute to such an evidence base. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2004. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Systematic literature review on the perceptions of ways in which support staff work to support pupils’ social and academic engagement in primary classrooms (1988–2003)

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2011.Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Systematic review of interventions aimed at improving the educational achievement of pupils identified as gifted and talented

The aim of the review was to find out the types of classroom-based interventions which improve the educational achievement of pupils identified as gifted and talented. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2008. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Impact of adult support staff on pupils and mainstream schools

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2011.Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

What is the effect of block scheduling on academic achievement? : a systematic review

Block scheduling is one approach to school scheduling. It typically means that students have fewer classes (4-5) per day, for a longer period of time (70-90 minutes). There are three main types of block schedule investigated in this review. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2010.Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Reducing bullying amongst the worst affected

A collation and synthesis of research findings in the field of school age bullying.

It was commissioned by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF), under the previous administration, in order to provide an evidence base for the development of policy, communications and implementation plans to address the prevalence of bullying amongst those worse affected.

Health and well-being in schools project: final report

Report that focused on outcomes from the Health and Well-being in Schools project, which ran from September 2008 to March 2011, and the learning it created.

Tough love, not get tough: responsive approaches to improving behaviour in schools

Briefing that shows that schools which succeed in engaging children and improving behaviour for the long term respond to their pupils’ needs by offering an authoritative approach to discipline which addresses the underlying causes of bad behaviour, which often lie in problems at home.