pre-school children

Podcast from Curriculum for Excellence - A Creative Curriculum, Crawfurd Theatre, Glasgow, 24th/25th April 2009. Talk by Helene Guldberg, author and lecturer, Open University.

National guidance for education authorities, independent schools, school staff and all others working with children in an education context in Scotland. Published in March 2003.

Handbook for schools and education authorities describing good practice in child protection in education and when a child goes missing from education.

The pilot programme was to run for a two-year period with the key aim of providing positive preschool experiences one year early for vulnerable children and supporting their parents.

Information leaflet for parents, carers and family members on how out-of-school-hours learning activities promote learning, healthy lifestyles and fun.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This paper focuses on the services provided to young children (from pre-birth to 5) and their families.

It sets out a framework which draws together existing policies from across the Scottish Executive in this area – whether that is promoting childcare, health visitor support, preschool education or broader support for parenting skills.

It seeks to promote greater coherence between these executive policies to give better support to joined-up delivery on the ground.

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Study looking at the types of child care available to asylum seekers and refugees across the spectrum of communal provision with a view to noting the attitudes of asylum seeker families towards pre-five provision, identifying restrictions in accessing pre-five services, establishing whether there are identifiable gaps in provision and determining if the service meets the needs of asylum seeker families.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.