pre-school children

Short film that has been made by Media Co-Op, for all pre-school support organisations (HomeStart, First Step and Sure Start) who help parents to show what the services offer and can offer to all parents of any background or walk of life. The parents speak about their experience, opportunities and the great support they get from these charity based organisations. Susan Deacon (Member of the Scottish Parliament) was apart of this feature film and will be using this in one of her campaigns.

Portal designed for those working in health or social services with responsiblity for early years (pre-birth-5 years).

Research that reviews how a national process of education reform for children aged 3-18 was under way and revision of the existing curriculum guidance for children aged three to five was being considered.

The review aims to point to examples, raise issues and look critically at evidence but makes no claims to be exhaustive.

The aim of this evaluation was to measure the effectiveness of play@home in meeting its key programme outcomes (for babies, toddlers and pre-school age children) namely, improved:

- physical activity and motor skills
- cognitive and social development
- parent-child bonding.

play@home is a physical activity promotion programme for children from birth to five years which promotes interaction and loving touch to encourage bonding between parent and child. It has been developed on the philosophy that parents and carers are children's first educators.

Thesis that presents a study of three and four year-old children attending preschool at a time of rapid expansion of this phase of education. There is strong evidence that the quality of the experience is the determining factor in the long term effectiveness of early years provision. However, quality is a contested concept with a range of viewpoints, defined by different stakeholders including children.

Study that sets out to consider some of these issues, exploring three of the most common and easily accessible measures used in England for identifying the quality of centre-based early years settings.

Pre-school education and care (PSEC) is often claimed as a ‘win-win’ policy which simultaneously enhances both economic competitiveness and social cohesion. High levels of PSEC are said to raise living standards by increasing female employment rates and improving young people’s skills and to mitigate inequalities by reducing social gaps in learning outcomes. Much of the evidence for this rests on analysis of data for a small number of countries. In this paper the claims are tested using cross-national time series data for a large number of OECD countries.

Report that clarifies the complex education and care divisions for children under 5 in Scotland, and provides practical recommendations for making integrated early years services a reality, so that Scotland’s Early Childhood Education and Care provision can match the best in Europe.