looked after children

As part of the NSPCC's strategy to improve outcomes for those children who are most at risk, it will be delivering innovative services that seek to capture learning about what works to keep looked after children safe from harm.

This web resource provides information on the looked after children, why looked after children are at risk, safeguarding concerns, as well as further resources, news and statistics.

Report that examines the particular perceptions and experiences of mental health stigma amongst looked after young people. Around 60% of looked after young people have some level of mental health problem (National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence) and in addition are often amongst the most marginalised in our society.

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

The focus of the thematic review was on those aspects of casework which are unique to youth offenders or are particularly problematic.

These included:
• the quality of youth offender charging decisions including pre-court disposals
• the application of the ‘grave crime’ provisions and other related provisions under S51 Crime and Disorder Act 1998 as amended
• the quality of remand applications in respect of youth offenders
• the role of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in preventing offending.

Serious case review based on a 15 year old girl who died in 2009 as a result of cardiac arrest. The post-mortem investigations found that she had inhaled butane gas prior to her death.

Child D was the younger child of two siblings and was looked after by the local authority during the months before her death.

Briefing produced to support an inquiry by the Education and Culture Committee into the educational attainment of looked after children.

Despite ten years of policy effort to improve the educational attainment of looked after children, national statistics show that attainment and school attendance is still much lower and exclusions much higher than the average for all pupils.

Public health guidance: promoting the quality of life of looked-after children and young people. This is NICE and SCIE’s formal guidance on improving the physical and emotional health and wellbeing of looked-after children and young people. SCIE guide 40. This guide is one of a series published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). SCIE guides are one-stop shops for social care practitioners, presenting key findings, current legislation and examples of what is working well to guide and inform practice. Guide published in January 2009.

Statistical release that provides information about looked after children in England for the year ending 31 March 2011. It includes information on the number of looked after children, the reason why a child is looked after, their legal status and placement type.

It also includes information on the number of children who started to be looked after during the year ending 31 March 2011 and the number of children who ceased to be looked after during the year.

Publication that contains statistics obtained from linking, for the first time, looked after children‟s data provided by local authority social work services departments with educational data provided by publicly funded schools, the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and Skills Development Scotland (SDS).

It presents key findings on a range of educational outcome statistics for children or young people who have been looked after continuously during the 12-month period, in different types of care placements, and for pupils with multiple placements within the school year.

Briefing paper produced to highlight the key research messages from the Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s services (C4EO) for general practitioners (GPs) and other commissioners and providers of health services, across a number of thematic areas.

The messages help to illustrate some of the interventions that have been proven to have a positive impact and make a difference in people’s lives.