looked after children

Paper that gives a brief outline of the principles which govern the care and protection of children by public authorities, the main legislation and guidance in the area of children‟s hearings and local authority child protection systems together with some key statistics.

In 2011, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) was asked by the Department for Education and the Department of Health to pilot the development of two quality standards for social care. This builds on earlier work in 2009 to establish a quality standards programme for healthcare.

This is one of the two standards on the subject of looked-after children.

Enquire is the Scottish advice service for additional support for learning. The publications section contains leaflets, guides, factsheets, newsletters and briefing papers.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence's (SCIE) new website, Info 4 Care Kids , provides information on how to survive and thrive in care by offering practical tips from life choices, independent living, staying in touch with family and friends, keeping healthy - through to bullying support, job searching, and coping mechanisms.

Concerns have been raised regarding the care and support received by children who go missing from care. In response to these concerns, the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Runaway and Missing Children and Adults and the APPG for Looked After Children and Care Leavers called a parliamentary Inquiry to examine these issues more closely.

Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social care trusts in Northern Ireland have introduced ‘therapeutic approaches’ in a number of children’s homes, and in the regional secure units, with the aim of improving staff skills and outcomes for young people. This At a glance briefing summarises an evaluation of the approaches conducted between May 2010 and February 2012. The full details can be found in SCIE Report 58 (Macdonald et al, 2012). Summary published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Children and young people in care are some of the most vulnerable in society. A small but significant proportion of looked-after children across the UK are cared for in residential settings such as children's homes. Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social Care (HSC) Trusts in Northern Ireland introduced 'therapeutic approaches' in a number of children's homes and in the regional secure units. This report gives the results of an evaluation of these approaches. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Policy report that considers how, despite significant improvements in legislation and statutory guidance, culture and practice across the care system does not consistently support high levels of achievement in education for young people in and from care.

Open Doors, Open Minds was a project run by The Who Cares? Trust in 2011/12 which explored the barriers that prevent young people in and from care pursuing and completing courses of study in further and higher education.