looked after children

Assessment and support for kinship carers of looked after children

Scottish Government interim guidance to local authorities on assessing the capacity of a child's relatives as potential kinship carers for a looked after child and the support they will require.

The assessment process should help kinship carers to feel more involved and consulted and able to identify the kinds of supports they believe they need to look after the child safely and in a way that promotes the child's best interests.

Improving the education of looked after children: a guide for local authorities and service providers

This guide for practice booklet is based on the key findings of the national research of Scottish Government-funded pilot projects in 18 Scottish local authorities carried out by the University of Strathclyde between 2006 and 2008.

The Fostering of Children (Scotland) Regulations 1996

These regulations set out the requirements by law for the approval of foster carers by local authorities; the placement of foster children; arrangements with voluntary organisations and the retention and confidentiality of case records for foster carers and children.

The appointment, composition and function of fostering panels is also laid out and the Schedules include information required from prospective foster carers and the requirements of placement agreements.

Children looked after statistics 2007-08

Publication providing statistics on children who were looked after by or eligible for aftercare services from local authorities between 1st April 2007 and 31st March 2008.

Review of evidence relating to volatile substance abuse in Scotland

In early 2006, the Scottish Executive Justice Department commissioned a review of the available evidence on volatile substance abuse (VSA) among young people in Scotland, particularly, in relation to the prevalence and nature of VSA, successful prevention of VSA and effective communication of VSA information and messages.

This report details the findings of that review and makes recommendations for the way in which the review of evidence can be used to take forward the volatile substance abuse agenda in Scotland.

Fabricated or induced illness by carers

This report and its companion entitled Safeguarding Children in Whom Illness is Induced or Fabricated by Carers with Parenting Responsibilities, by the Department of Health, is essential reading for all paediatricians and other members of the multi-disciplinary team in the field of child protection. The Department of Health document sets out policy and guidelines for all professionals, whereas this document discusses clinical issues in more detail and provides practical advice for paediatricians.

The education of children in need

This review examines the education of children in need. It discusses the education of children looked after by local authorities; the impact of the Children Act 1989; the education of children out of school and the way these issues can be addressed.

Healthy Care

The Healthy Care Programme is funded by the Department for Education and Skills and developed by the National Children’s Bureau. It is a practical means of improving the health and well-being of looked after children and young people in line with the Department of Health Guidance Promoting the Health of Looked After Children (2002) and the Change for Children Programme.

Scotland's children: the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 regulations and guidance - Volume 2: children looked after by local authorities

This is the second of four volumes of comprehensive guidance on the Children (Scotland) Act 1995. The Regulations, Directions and Guidance which are included in this and the other volumes are designed to provide guidance on the implementation of Parts II, III and IV of the Act. Volume 2 sets out the legal framework for local authority responsibilities for children who are looked after; home supervision; fostering service; residential care; registration and inspection of certain residential schools; secure accommodation; throughcare and aftercare.