children in need

A 2002 report based on a survey by HM Inspectorate of Education of good practice in Scottish schools. Identifies seven key messages for practice.

An independent review of the systems in place to protect children and keep them safe in residential care in Scotland between 1950 and 1995.

The impact on earnings and employment of growing up in poverty. This report estimates the costs of child poverty in terms of reduced GDP, focusing on the lost earning potential of adults who have grown up in poverty.

This is an evaluation report of the Boarding Provision for Vulnerable Children Pathfinder announced in the white paper 'Higher standards, better schools for all' (2005). The Pathfinder was intended to explore whether boarding school provision might be used to provide support, stability and improved life chances for a larger number of vulnerable children and young people. Ten local authorities and fifty boarding schools originally signed up to the Pathfinder.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This report focuses on the discrimination experienced by families living in poverty in the UK ('povertyism'), examining the barriers preventing them from enjoying equal access to fundamental economic and social rights. Current thinking, in the national and international poverty debate, is that the question of rights, and their absence, is linked to poverty. Povertyism perpetuates a lack of knowledge and understanding about the lives of people experiencing poverty. The resulting policy approach leads to a denial of their basic human rights.

This briefing summarises the results of systematic reviews to investigate whether effective interventions exist for children and families where a child has experienced physical abuse. It focuses on secondary prevention of adverse child outcomes and recurrence of abuse in children who have experienced maltreatment. The interventions are grouped into: child focused; parent focused; and family focused. Implications for practice, policy and research are discussed.

The government has high-profile child poverty targets which are assessed using a measure of income, as recorded in the Household Below Average Income series (HBAI).

However, income is an imperfect measure of living standards. Previous analysis suggests that some children in households with low income do not have commensurately low living standards.

This report aims to document the extent to which this is true, focusing on whether children in low-income households have different living standards depending on whether their parents are employed, self-employed, or workless.

A research report identifying interventions that appeared to make the most differences in terms of both the educational experience and the educational outcomes of the looked after children and young people participating in the pilot projects.

The report was produced by Strathclyde University and published by the Scottish Government.