children in need

A compact and user-friendly booklet for children aged seven to twelve. It talks in straightforward language about what domestic violence is, how it can make children feel, and how and where they can get help.

The booklet explains that domestic violence is not their fault, and that there are people who will listen and understand.

This project explored parents’ experiences of situations where concerns of Non-Accidental Injury (NAI) were raised and how they remembered and reflected on these. It also investigated increasing the awareness of paediatricians and other health professionals of what is perceived as helpful or less helpful from the parents' perspective, and making suggestions for paediatric training to improve communication.

Index of child well-being at local authority district and county council levels constructed using the methodology and approach applied to the Indices of Deprivation.

The report describes the current strengths and weaknesses in policy provision to combat child poverty when parental employment is constrained and is a timely analysis given the approaching 2010 deadline for halving child poverty from 1999 levels. The analysis uses original and unique tax-benefit modelling of current provision across a range of low-paid and out-of-work family profiles.

This At a glance summary presents a new ‘systems’ model for serious case reviews. The model provides a method for getting to the bottom of professional practice and exploring why actions or decisions that later turned out to be mistaken, or to have led to an unwanted outcome, seemed to those involved, to be the sensible thing to do at the time. The answers can generate new ideas about how to improve practice and so help keep children safe.

Children and young people in Scotland continue to live in run-down, overcrowded, damp housing or are stuck in temporary housing affecting all aspects of their current and future lives. This report presents an overview of the bad housing and homelessness situation in Scotland.

This document includes the draft Looked After Children (Scotland) Regulations 2008 and accompanying consultation document. It sets out the policy behind the draft Regulations and sought comments on a number of issues within the Regulations. The consultation period ran from 5 December 2007 to 14 March 2008.

Scottish Government report on what needs to be in place to provide a truly child-centred response and approach to the provision of foster and kinship care.

It then considers what improvements are needed in the support provided to carers that will in turn enhance the quality of care provided to children.

Finally, it addresses the improvements that can be made to the quality assurance systems that govern these types of care.

Drinking alcohol is very common. For most people, it is an enjoyable part of a party or going out with friends. Most people who drink do not have a drink problem. However, for some children and young people who call ChildLine, alcohol does cause problems. This can be because they are drinking too much. More commonly though, it is because someone they care about – a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, girlfriend, boyfriend or a friend – is drinking too much. For these callers, alcohol is a problem. This is called alcohol abuse.

Action for Children is committed to developing and delivering preventative services that allow children and young people to live safely within their own home. Our crisis intervention services, aimed at helping families with children at risk of entering the care system, have been judged a successful way to improve outcomes for children and young people, reducing admissions into care and building on families’ strengths and coping techniques.