child development

Paper suggesting research priorities regarding the social and communicative abilities of people with Down syndrome and emphasising the importance of parental involvement in research.

This resource from the BBC website presents a major thirty-part narrative history series exploring British childhood and the experience of British children over the last thousand years. Open2.net, the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC, has also produced a stimulating site to accompany the series, which can be linked to from this BBC webpage.

Document describing an Active Play project aimed specifically at fathers in which six-week courses were run in over 20 early years settings to encourage fathers to become more closely involved in their children's play.

UK Government white paper containing a range of proposed policies and initiatives to tackle and remove specific barriers to people being able to fulfill their potential.

Peter Lee is Director of the Childhood and Families Research and Development Centre at the University of Strathclyde. His research interests include professional practice development and equity and social justice. He is Co-chair of the Scottish Educational Research Association on Early Years.

This fact sheets provides information as to whether children’s outcomes are better if they live in environments that are supportive in terms of family, peers, and community.

Results indicate that children from supportive neighbourhoods are more likely to have stronger connections compared to their counterparts from less supportive neighbourhoods.

This study is one of a series of projects, jointly commissioned by the DCSF and the Department of Health, to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and focuses on recognition of neglect. This literature review aimed to provide a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how those signals are recognised and responded to and whether response could be swifter.

Report presenting the results of a follow-up survey, done in 2007, to the second national survey of children and young people's mental health and well-being carried out in 2004 by the Office for National Statistics on behalf of the Department of Health and the Scottish Government.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information on babies with Down's Syndrome for grandparents, relatives and friends.

Longitudinal surveys afford a unique opportunity to study change over time for the same individuals and to explore the impact of prior circumstances on long-term outcomes.

Using longitudinal data over four sweeps of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study, this report explores the impacts of poor maternal mental health on children’s emotional, cognitive and behavioural development and on their relationships with peers at ages three to four.