child development

Parental drug misuse : a review of impact and intervention studies

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.

Children's hearing system in Scotland

The children's hearings system, Scotland's unique system of juvenile justice, commenced operating on 15 April 1971. The system is centred on the welfare of the child. A fundamental principle is that the needs of the child should be the key test and that children who offend and children who are in need of care and protection should be dealt with in the same system. Cases relating to children who may require compulsory measures of intervention are considered by an independent panel of trained lay people.

Insight 6 : Meeting the Needs of Children from Birth to Three : Research Evidence and Implications for Out-of-Home Provision

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Growing up in Scotland (GUS): food and activity summary report

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Growing up in Scotland study: use of informal support by families with young children

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.

Growing up in Scotland: a study following the lives of Scotland's children - sweep 1 overview report

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Information sharing : case examples - integrated working to improve outcomes for children and young people

This document contains eight case examples focusing on different aspects of information sharing. These eight case examples support the cross-Government guidance document Information Sharing: Practitioners’ Guide by illustrating for practitioners the practical application of the guidance. The case examples cover a range of situations of relevance to everyone who work with children and young people, whether they are employed or volunteers, working in the public, private or voluntary sectors.

Growing up in Scotland: sweep 2 - topic research findings: summary of findings from year 2

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.