child care

Insight 6 : Meeting the Needs of Children from Birth to Three : Research Evidence and Implications for Out-of-Home Provision

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Aiming high for disabled children: better support for families

The government wants all children to have the best start in life and the ongoing support that they and their families need to fulfil their potential. Disabled children are less likely to achieve as much in a range of areas as their non-disabled peers.

Improving their outcomes, allowing them to benefit from equality of opportunity, and increasing their involvement and inclusion in society will help them to achieve more as individuals.

Support and Services for Parents: A Review of the Literature in Engaging and Supporting Parents

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

Future Scots : pre five services for asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow

Study looking at the types of child care available to asylum seekers and refugees across the spectrum of communal provision with a view to noting the attitudes of asylum seeker families towards pre-five provision, identifying restrictions in accessing pre-five services, establishing whether there are identifiable gaps in provision and determining if the service meets the needs of asylum seeker families.

Working together to safeguard children

Document that sets out a national framework of guidance on how all agencies and professionals should work together to promote children's welfare and protect them from abuse and neglect.

It is aimed at those who work in the health and education services, the police, social services, the probation service, and others whose work brings them into contact with children and families.

It is relevant to those working in the statutory, voluntary and independent sectors. It replaces the previous version of Working Together Under the Children Act 1989, which was published in 1991.

Growing up in Scotland: use of childcare by parents of young children

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

Growing up in Scotland study: use of informal support by families with young children

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.