child care

Despite tough times ahead, there is still political consensus around the goal to end child poverty. Based on new projections taking account of the recession, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has updated its assessment of what it will take to meet the government targets to halve child poverty by 2010 and eradicate it by 2020.

This report provides an assessment of the impact that childcare policies are likely to and might be able to have on the target of ending child poverty by 2020.

Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) is a major longitudinal study launched in 2005 with the aim of tracking a group of children and their families from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Government its main aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

An interactive game designed to help students test their knowledge about law and social work. It will help users: acquire and consolidate knowledge of specific legal rules; develop a critical perspective on those rules; describe the location of specific legal rules. It is designed as a fun game similar in structure to the TV show 'Who wants to be a Millionaire'. NOTE: This game is based on the law and practice in England and Wales.

This research project was commissioned by the Scottish Executive to find out how advocacy for children in the Children’s Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children’s Hearings System and how these can be improved.

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

The government wants all children to have the best start in life and the ongoing support that they and their families need to fulfil their potential. Disabled children are less likely to achieve as much in a range of areas as their non-disabled peers.

Improving their outcomes, allowing them to benefit from equality of opportunity, and increasing their involvement and inclusion in society will help them to achieve more as individuals.

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Study looking at the types of child care available to asylum seekers and refugees across the spectrum of communal provision with a view to noting the attitudes of asylum seeker families towards pre-five provision, identifying restrictions in accessing pre-five services, establishing whether there are identifiable gaps in provision and determining if the service meets the needs of asylum seeker families.