babies

This guidance has been developed for practitioners in Newcastle working with children and families and/or adults who have care of children where substance misuse is a factor, which affects their lives. It has been produced in response to the increasing problem of substance misuse and particularly the rising number of children who are referred into the child protection arena due to parental substance misuse.

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information for new parents about babies with Down's Syndrome and includes information on the baby's development, ways to support good health, future pregnancies as well as looking to the future and living with Down's Syndrome.

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.

The Mellow Babies intervention was designed to develop close attunement between the mother and the child using a combination of baby-massage, interaction coaching and infant focused speech.

A waiting-list-controlled evaluation of the Mellow Babies intervention is described.

The objectives were to measure change in maternal depressive symptoms and the quality of interaction between mothers and babies. Recruitment was less than had been hoped, but for those mothers who completed the group, feedback from referrers and participants was positive.

Report reviewing the second year of the implementation of a pilot Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) programme in ten sites in England. The programme is an evidence-based nurse home visiting programme developed in the USA, intended to improve the health, well-being and self-sufficiency of young first-time parents and their children.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.

Report presenting the findings of the Children's Commissioner for England's visit to Yarl's Wood in 2008 and considering the detention of children there in the light of the UK Government's obligations under Article 37 of the UNCRC. It looks particularly at the effect of detention on children's mental and physical health.

Harsh Realities looks at how doctors, nurses, social services, and advisers take vital decisions about people's lives. The second programme in the series tackles child disability and the stark choices facing parents and professionals when a baby is born severely disabled. In each programme, Niall Dickson will be joined by professionals who have direct experience of the subject under discussion. In order to listen to this programme select programme 1 for audio access.

Child of Our Time is one of the programmes available on the Open2.net website, which is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC. The programme's presenter Robert Winston returns to the children born in the year 2000 to discover how they're developing. The children are now learning right from wrong, discovering about happiness - and, for some, adjusting to no longer being an only child.