babies

Report that presents new research from 4Children that shows that many families are suffering the consequences of postnatal depression in silence; that if and when they do seek help mothers are not getting the swift access to the range of treatment options they need; and that this is having a detrimental impact on families across Britain.

Serious case review summary detailing the death of a premature baby, which was nursed in the Special Care Baby unit, but later died at the family home.

The Scottish Government wants to ensure that all children have the best possible start to life, are ready to succeed and live longer, healthier lives.

To help achieve this, an Infant Nutrition Framework for Action has been developed, which is aimed at a wide variety of organisations with a role in improving maternal and infant nutrition in Scotland.

Each year around 20,000 children have their futures decided by the family courts. Baby William Ward was one of them. His parents Jake and Victoria were investigated by police and social services when they were unable to explain a serious injury to their three-month-old son. It took them two years to clear their names and a further three years to win the right to speak completely openly about what happened to their family.

This website has been developed by the Early Childhood Unit (ECU) at the National Children's Bureau in England. The Early Childhood Unit (ECU) aims to ensure that all who work with young children and their families can access the best information and support to improve their policies and practice. ECU encourages discussion and debate about the needs of young children and develops practical projects to support practitioners.

This report uses data from the Growing up in Scotland (GUS) study to explore the contribution of specific measures of advantage and disadvantage in relation to a number of specific health related behaviours for parent and child and, in doing so, seeks to identify the characteristics of more vulnerable and more resilient families. Findings are based on the first sweep of GUS, which involved interviews with the main carers of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, carried out between April 2005 and March 2006.

Listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and what it is they need from their early years experience. Understanding listening in this way is key to providing an environment in which all children feel confident, safe and powerful, ensuring they have the time and space to express themselves in whatever form suits them. This resource refers to listeners as adults and looks specifically at listening to babies.

Parents’ expectations and experiences of pregnancy, birth and the first few months of parenting are presented as part of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

This resource produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information on the screening and testing methods used to try and detect Down's Syndrome in an unborn child.

This paper was published in February 2000 as CASEpaper 34 by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics. It was written by Sheldon Danziger and Jane Waldfogel and is based on a Conference held in 1998 at Columbia University which looked at the investments required in child development to break the cycle of poverty. It concentrates on disadvantaged children and their families from pregnancy to adolescence.