conditions of employment

This research report presents findings from a qualitative study specifically designed to explore the effects of benefit sanctions on lone parents' employment decisions and moves into employment. Forty lone parents who had been referred for a sanction following non-attendance at a Work Focused Interview (WFI) were interviewed in depth. Focus groups were also carried out with Jobcentre Plus staff.

The impact on earnings and employment of growing up in poverty. This report estimates the costs of child poverty in terms of reduced GDP, focusing on the lost earning potential of adults who have grown up in poverty.

Study which examines the pressures which lead to employers offering low-paid, insecure jobs and also considers the scope for change.

Ten years on from the publication of the Lawrence Inquiry report, the Equality and Human Rights Commission wanted to consider what progress the police service has made in terms of race equality. This report deals with four main themes: employment, training, retention and promotion; stop and search; the national DNA database; race hate crimes. The findings are discussed under the aforementioned headings and a number of case studies are presented.

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

Report that reviews evaluation findings from the US experience in providing return-to-work supports for people with disabilities and discusses the implications for similar efforts in the UK.

It provides lessons for developing and evaluating future UK employment initiatives, especially for people with severe psychiatric conditions and long-term disability claimants.

Household incomes are dynamic and families can move in and out of poverty over time, with some of them becoming trapped in a cycle. What causes this kind of ‘recurrent’ poverty and how does it relate to unemployment and low pay? How could these cycles be broken? This report summarises the findings of four projects about recurrent poverty and the low-pay/no-pay cycle and examines relevant current UK policy and practice and suggests ways to create longer-lasting routes out of poverty.