conditions of employment

Given the value placed on zero-hour contracts by some employers and workers, and the incomplete picture of their scale, an outright ban seems inappropriate at this time. But maintaining the status quo would overlook the poor use of these arrangements in a considerable minority of cases.

Systematic review to establish the research evidence of the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and employee health and its impact on organisational production. Searches in several databases were performed in September 2009. Previously known studies were also included.

Paper that steps back from the current annual debate about the appropriate but small rise in the value of the minimum wage to ask a bolder question: are there more radical reforms of the minimum wage that could raise living standards in the years ahead? It discusses what happens in labour markets where the minimum wage is much higher than it is in Britain today. It also asks whether a smarter design could do more to benefit the groups that are most in need of higher wages?

Paper which provides evidence on the key challenges faced by families today as members attempt to manage work and care, and critically examines policy solutions and initiatives, offered by governments, employers and civil society actors to ensure work-family balance.

The report is structured in three sections. Section 1 sets out data on long-term trends in UK female employment and on how the UK measures up internationally. Section 2 drills down into the international data to better diagnose the UK’s specific performance issues on female employment with a particular focus on maternal employment. Section 3 describes what countries with better female employment rates do differently from the UK in terms of public spending on family policy. The note concludes by sketching out some general and high-level strategic implications.

The International Centre for Systematic Reviews on Human Resources for Health, Makerere University School of Public Health, working with the EPPI-Centre in London, conducted a systematic review to assess the different regulatory mechanisms employed to deal with dual practice and the effect of these mechanisms on health worker performance. The review aimed at synthesizing the dual practice regulatory mechanisms proposed and implemented worldwide and to document factors key to their implementation, either barriers or facilitators and some of their reported outcomes.

This is the fourth edition of Youth Tracker, ippr's quarterly newsletter looking at how Britain’s young people are faring in the recession and recovery, and what can be done to support them. August brings the prospect of exam results and young people having to decide on their next steps in life. This edition of Youth Tracker focuses on how to put these young people at the forefront of education and skills policy.

This report presents findings of a qualitative research project commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to investigate the relationship between mental health and employment. The research was conducted during 2007 by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York and the Institute for Employment Studies.

This report presents the findings from an exploratory qualitative study that centres on a key Department for Work and Pensions client group that until now has not been extensively researched in terms of its interaction with benefit and employment services and the labour market. It focuses on a cohort of 40 (male) ex-prisoners who were tracked over a six-month period following their release from prison.

The importance of employment and its links with mental health are summarised and the European policy context described. The report then asks what the consequences of poor mental health for economic activity are, if a trend in productivity losses over time can be seen and what we know about employment rates for people with mental health problems. Barriers to employment, the economic case for helping such people remain in the workforce, assessing the cost effectiveness of interventions to this end, legislative and policy actions, and the way forward are discussed.