employment

Paper that argues for the need to join up and personalise support for the most disengaged young people, and those at risk of longer term disengagement, to participate more effectively in work, learning and volunteering.

Paper which provides evidence on the key challenges faced by families today as members attempt to manage work and care, and critically examines policy solutions and initiatives, offered by governments, employers and civil society actors to ensure work-family balance.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) commissioned the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR) to undertake a qualitative study of offender employment services, with a specific focus on the progress made in the implementation of the recommendations of the joint DWP/Ministry of Justice (MOJ) offender employment review.

Paper that reviews evidence on: employment-related disclosure beliefs and behaviours of people with a mental health problem; factors associated with the disclosure of a mental health problem in the employment setting; whether employers are less likely to hire applicants who disclose a mental health problem; and factors influencing employers’ hiring beliefs and behaviours towards job applicants with a mental health problem.

The report is structured in three sections. Section 1 sets out data on long-term trends in UK female employment and on how the UK measures up internationally.

Section 2 drills down into the international data to better diagnose the UK’s specific performance issues on female employment with a particular focus on maternal employment.

Section 3 describes what countries with better female employment rates do differently from the UK in terms of public spending on family policy. The note concludes by sketching out some general and high-level strategic implications.

Key points from the report include:
* the high level of workforce growth which was seen in the sector between the mid-90s and 2005/6 has slowed for the second year running with the social services workforce growing by around 1,000 people, representing 0.5% growth
* the private sector employed an extra 2,000 staff increasing its overall share and making it the largest employer in the sector with 40% of the workforce
* the public sector employs 34% of the total social care workforce
* 69.5% of the private workforce is employed in care homes for adults.

The high level of young people who are NEET – not in employment, education or training – is one of the most serious social problems facing the country. There are currently an estimated 979,000 16-24 year NEETs in England. This represents 16 per cent of this age group. 186,000 of these young people are aged 16-18. This snapshot analysis is the first paper produced as part of a research partnership between The Work Foundation and the Private Equity Foundation. It investigates the geography of NEETS, focusing on the 53 largest towns and cities in Great Britain.

Report that presents the results of Eurofound’s work on company initiatives for workers with care responsibilities for disabled children or adults.

The research focused on initiatives that employers can take to support the needs of workers who have (informal) care responsibilities, including parents caring for children with disabilities and carers of adults who need care because of disability, illness or old age.

This report is based on the outcome of extensive discussion over the summer 2011 with businesses, individuals, leading academics and third sector bodies following the publication of 'Mapping the route to growth'.

It aimed to establish the steps that could be taken to ensure barriers to employment are broken down.