employment

This review examines the impact of drug use upon families and carers and identifies their needs. It examines and describes the range of provision and methods of addressing the needs of families and carers. It gives particular attention to the development of family support groups. It also offers information about resources available to agencies, service providers and family support groups.

Report describing a research study which aimed to assess the effect of employment on the health of individuals and identify the ways in which services, delivered both individually and collectively, have helped move people with health problems towards and into employment.

Paper setting out the potential shape of mental health services in England in 2015. Among other ambitions, it sees services as more accessible, equal, more supportive of carers, producing better care planning, offering individual budgets and investing in service user groups.

Report summarising the results of a survey of 1003 adults across the UK on their attitudes to young people in care. The findings demonstrate the potential for community support in challenging myths which might hamper young care leavers in their efforts to move forward with their lives.

Paper assessing and discussing the position of adult skills training in England in the context of the creation of the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF), the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) and the continuation of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). It argues that giving responsibility for funding adult skills training to the DIUS risks adult skills being left behind by higher education.

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

Report providing an overview of the conditionality-based welfare systems in the United States, Australia, Germany, Sweden and Norway and comparing these with the UK system to see if they hold any lessons for the welfare system in the UK.

Survey assessing what progress has been made in alleviating social problems in the areas of welfare, employment, education, health, crime and community.

Workbook intended to help local authority and health partners gather data from across the whole system in order to assist capacity planning and inform local commissioning plans when considering learning disability services.

Britain’s Poorest Children Revisited focuses on the experience of severe and persistent child poverty in the UK during the period 1994- 2002. The report begins by examining trends in childhood experience of severe and non-severe poverty between 1994 and 2002, with particular reference to changes after 1997, when new policies were introduced to address the problem of child poverty in the UK.