unemployment

Report assessing the magnitude of the social and economic costs of mental health problems in Scotland and arguing that greater mental health promotion and prevention work could bring considerable benefits in the form of improved outcomes, increased recovery rates and decreased prevalence of mental health problems.

Paper highlighting the difficulties and barriers faced by ex-offenders when seeking employment and documenting the social and economic consequences of this situation, both for the offender and wider society. To help remove these barriers it argues for measures such as a network for employers to share their experiences of employing ex-offenders.

Providing tailored one-to-one support to help people back into work has been central to the UK Government's reform of the welfare system. This report argues that a new examination is needed on the role of personal advisers. The report is based on focus groups with service users, in-depth interviews with advisers, surveys of personal advisers and employment providers and a review of the literature. Qualitative analysis is presented to show changes in the ratio of Job Centre Plus advisers to the number of interviews they conducted since the recession began.

This report uses data from the Families and Children Study to investigate the characteristics of families that include a disabled adult and/or child. Questions posed by this research include, for instance, how do disability and caring responsibilities relate to families' ages, size, ethnic origins and so on? How far does disability cluster together within families, given that worklessness appears often related to ill-health?

With unemployment rising steadily for the first time since the early 1990s, the adequacy of JSA (the social security benefit paid to people who are unemployed and looking for work) is a matter of acute importance. Taking account of inflation, its value has not changed in thirty years.

The New Policy Institute has produced its 2009 edition of indicators of poverty and social exclusion in Wales, providing a comprehensive analysis of trends. This is the second update of Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Wales, following the original report in 2005, but is the first to be published in a recession. After reviewing ten-year trends in low income statistics, its focus shifts to unemployment and problem debt.

Report presenting and discussing the findings of a study which made use of a variety of approaches and sources to construct as detailed a picture as possible of how and why poverty varies across ethnic groups. In particular, it focuses on the extent to which it is possible to explain the poverty of ethnic minority children in terms of known risk factors such as lone parent families.

This working paper reviews the evidence on the impact of the last three economic recessions on the PSA 8 (indicator 2) disadvantaged groups (that is, disabled people, ethnic minorities, lone parents, people aged 50 and over, the 15 per cent lowest qualified, and those living in the most deprived local authority wards), as well as ex-offenders and the self-employed.

Report assessing the effects of economic recession on different social groups in the UK. It concludes that young people, men and those living in deprived areas are worst affected and recommends that retraining and upskilling should be carried out to enable people to compete successfully in the labour market.

Paper discussing how women are disadvantaged by the pensions and social security system and arguing for changes which take account of changing work patterns and a recognition that the caring responsibilities often undertaken by women are of value to society as a whole.