unemployment

‘Social evils’ and ‘social problems’ in Britain, 1904–2008

In a contribution to the JRF's 'social evils' series, Jose Harris examines social problems and changing perceptions of them since 1904. Social evils, such as hunger and destitution, were seen by the Victorians as unavoidable. Joseph Rowntree's more positive philosophy promoted social research and intervention to transform 'social evils' into less malign 'social problems' that could be cured. However, some of these problems have subsequently reappeared.

Migration and rural economies: assessing and addressing risks

This paper examines the implications of increasing migration to rural areas, looking in particular at the economics of this phenomenon. A mixed methodology was used including a literature review, analysis of national population and economic datasets, surveys and focus groups with migrants in rural areas and interviews with key informants. The roles migrants play in rural areas are explored, as are the economic impacts of migration on existing populations and businesses, and what future migratory trends might be.

Living with social evils - the voices of unheard groups

Paper dealing with the social evils of UK society as experienced by people whose voices are not usually heard. Workshops/discussion groups with lone parents, ex-offenders, unemployed and other vulnerable and socially excluded people were used to explore personal experiences of living and coping with social evils. Ideas for overcoming them suggest a combined individual and collective responsibility to take forward social change.

Work and wellbeing: developing primary mental health care services (Briefing 34)

Paper looking at the issue of how GPs can offer patients effective support to return to work following the issuing of a medical certificate due to mental health problems. It recommends a four-stage approach which involves appropriate therapy, an assessment of fitness to work, communication with employers and a back-to-work plan.

A call to debate, a call to action : a report on the health of the population of NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde 2007-2008

Report documenting the key public health challenges facing the Greater Glasgow and Clyde area and laying out priority actions to tackle these challenges. Issues discussed include inequalities in health, obesity and alcohol misuse.

Child Poverty Review, July 2004

This document presents the findings of the "review, to examine the welfare reform and public services changes necessary to advance towards the Government's long-term goal of halving and eradicating child poverty." "The review includes both medium-term plans emerging from the 2004 Spending Review, and an assessment of the longer-term direction which policy needs to take in order to meet the Government's new child poverty target set out in the Spending Review."

What's it worth? : the social and economic costs of mental health problems in Scotland

Report assessing the magnitude of the social and economic costs of mental health problems in Scotland and arguing that greater mental health promotion and prevention work could bring considerable benefits in the form of improved outcomes, increased recovery rates and decreased prevalence of mental health problems.

You're hired! : encouraging the employment of ex-offenders (Research note)

Paper highlighting the difficulties and barriers faced by ex-offenders when seeking employment and documenting the social and economic consequences of this situation, both for the offender and wider society. To help remove these barriers it argues for measures such as a network for employers to share their experiences of employing ex-offenders.

Disability and caring among families with children: Family employment and poverty characteristics

This report uses data from the Families and Children Study to investigate the characteristics of families that include a disabled adult and/or child. Questions posed by this research include, for instance, how do disability and caring responsibilities relate to families' ages, size, ethnic origins and so on? How far does disability cluster together within families, given that worklessness appears often related to ill-health?

Ethnicity and child poverty (Research report no.576)

Report presenting and discussing the findings of a study which made use of a variety of approaches and sources to construct as detailed a picture as possible of how and why poverty varies across ethnic groups. In particular, it focuses on the extent to which it is possible to explain the poverty of ethnic minority children in terms of known risk factors such as lone parent families.