unemployment

Zeroing in: balancing protection and flexibility in the reform of zero-hour contracts

Given the value placed on zero-hour contracts by some employers and workers, and the incomplete picture of their scale, an outright ban seems inappropriate at this time. But maintaining the status quo would overlook the poor use of these arrangements in a considerable minority of cases.

Employment status and health: understanding the health of the economically inactive population in Scotland

Although the association between health and unemployment has been well examined, less attention has been paid to the health of the economically inactive (EI) population. Scotland has one of the worst health records compared to any Western European country and the EI population account for 23% of the working age population.

The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the health outcomes and behaviours of the employed, unemployed and the EI populations (further subdivided into the permanently sick, looking after home and family [LAHF] and others) in Scotland.

Social justice: transforming lives

Report that looks at the scale of the challenge of transforming lives in terms of social justice, including supporting families, keeping young people on track, supporting the most disadvantaged adults, and how to deliver social justice.

Generation lost: youth unemployment and the youth labour market

Report that examines the causes of youth unemployment , the youth labour market in UK and compared to other countries, and whether welfare to work programmes can reduce youth unemployment.

Youth unemployment: the crisis we cannot afford

Youth unemployment is now one of the greatest challenges facing the country. Nearly 1½ million young people are currently not in education, employment or training – over 1 in 5 of all young people. A quarter of a million have been unemployed for over a year. The costs of these levels of long-term youth unemployment – now and in the future – are enormous. The Commission on Youth Unemployment was set up in September 2011 by ACEVO (the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations) in response to widespread concern amongst voluntary sector leaders about youth unemployment.

Measuring the intergenerational correlation of worklessness

Research that uses the vast developments in the measurement of the intergenerational earnings mobility correlation over the past twenty years to explore the issues surrounding the measurement of the intergenerational correlation of worklessness.

The early bird...preventing young people from becoming a NEET statistic

Despite increasing concern about youth unemployment, there has been little work to date focused on identifying those at risk of becoming NEET (Not in employment, education or training) and the evidence base on intervention programs that can make a difference.

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion 2011

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

Understanding the worklessness dynamics and characteristics of deprived areas

The analysis in this report breaks new ground in using individual-level data on employment transitions and geographical movements to try to shed light on some unanswered questions about the dynamics of worklessness in deprived areas.

The individual-level dynamics operating in persistently deprived neighbourhoods in Great Britain are examined. The research is motivated by the need to better understand the dynamics and characteristics of deprived areas in order to support evidence-based policy responses.

Youth labour's lost

Report that presents research into the issue of youth unemployment in the UK. Rather than potential macroeconomic and global causes, it is concerned with the way the education system and labour market have been shaped by policy so as to produce what we describe as a 'young person’s penalty'.