education

This knowledge review was conducted to identify good practice in the teaching and learning of assessment in social work qualifying courses to assist social work educators in developing teaching frameworks. However, a lack of evaluated teaching methods has made it difficult to recommend one or more approaches to teaching assessment skills. As a result, this review makes recommendations to guide the development of good practice in this aspect of the social work curriculum. Review published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in November 2003.

Research brief that presents the interim findings of the research based on evidence from a census survey of LADOs in 2011. The survey collected data on allegations of abuse made against teachers, non-teaching staff in schools and further education (FE) teachers referred to LADOs in the period 1st April 2009 to 31st March 2010.

Questions explored the number and nature of allegations referred, investigative action taken, time taken to conduct investigations and outcomes.

Report that clarifies the complex education and care divisions for children under 5 in Scotland, and provides practical recommendations for making integrated early years services a reality, so that Scotland’s Early Childhood Education and Care provision can match the best in Europe.

This report draws on the views of service users and carers from the Social Work Education Participation (SWEP) website steering group and members of the General Social Care Council (GSCC) Visitors group who inspect social work programmes with GSCC inspectors. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in July 2011. Review date is July 2014.

This paper outlines a project commissioned by the Department of Health which focused on participation in the undergraduate and postgraduate social work degree. Focusing on how service user and care organisations can develop their involvement in the undergraduate and post graduate social work degree and drawing on successes of the first two years, the paper then goes on to identify existing barriers to successful partnership and possible ways forward. This project was a joint venture between Shaping Our Lives, Department of Health and SCIE.

Briefing produced to support an inquiry by the Education and Culture Committee into the educational attainment of looked after children.

Despite ten years of policy effort to improve the educational attainment of looked after children, national statistics show that attainment and school attendance is still much lower and exclusions much higher than the average for all pupils.

Report that assesses how much social housing tenants could be described as "socially excluded‟ in 2000, and whether and if so, how and by how much this had changed by 2011.

It explores how much any change in the social exclusion of social housing residents can be attributed to housing and regeneration policies, and how much to other factors, including broader housing and social exclusion policy, and economic and social change.

The aim of Using SCIE resources is to help organisations or individuals implement SCIE’s work. It will help organisations develop and strengthen their workforce enabling them to provide high-quality services for the people they support. Using SCIE resources includes a presentation slide set template and notes on its use, and an example of SCIE’s new At a glance summaries. This guide is one of a series published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

Publication that contains statistics obtained from linking, for the first time, looked after children‟s data provided by local authority social work services departments with educational data provided by publicly funded schools, the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and Skills Development Scotland (SDS).

It presents key findings on a range of educational outcome statistics for children or young people who have been looked after continuously during the 12-month period, in different types of care placements, and for pupils with multiple placements within the school year.

This is the third edition of Youth Tracker, the quarterly newsletter looking at how Britain’s young people are faring in the recession, and what we can do to support them. A lot has happened since the last edition: Britain is now formally out of recession and a general election campaign is in full swing. Nevertheless, around 900,000 young people remain out of employment, education or training, with a serious risk of being ‘left behind’ by society.