education

Policy report that considers how, despite significant improvements in legislation and statutory guidance, culture and practice across the care system does not consistently support high levels of achievement in education for young people in and from care.

Open Doors, Open Minds was a project run by The Who Cares? Trust in 2011/12 which explored the barriers that prevent young people in and from care pursuing and completing courses of study in further and higher education.

Paper that helps documenting the importance of the association between poor mental health, educational attainment and subsequent dropping-out behaviour.

It suggests (but does not prove) that there could be a causal mechanism. Thus, programmes aimed at improving the mental health of adolescents may be very important for improving educational attainment and reducing the number of young people who are 'NEET' (not in education, employment or training).

The free entitlement to education is the Department’s primary financial intervention in children’s early education. All three- and four-year-olds are entitled to 15 hours per week of free education, starting the term after a child’s third birthday. The scope of the entitlement has evolved since it was introduced in 1998 for all four-year-olds.

Paper that outlines the practical case for retaining a local authority funded education welfare service (also sometimes known as the education or school social work service) which has with a clear remit for providing support to children and young people who are at risk of poor educational outcomes due to their poor attendance and behaviour.

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

Report that presents research that has been undertaken by IPPR to generate a stronger evidence base on the operation and impact of madrassas in the UK.

It identifies challenges that need to be addressed by policymakers, local communities and madrassas themselves. It also identifies ways in which madrassas can achieve their full potential as a positive influence in the lives of Muslim children and society as a whole.

Annual report that presents evidence from inspection and regulatory visits undertaken between September 2010 and August 2011 by the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted).

It takes evidence from inspection activity across the full range of Ofsted’s statutory remit, which includes early years and childcare, provision for education and skills in schools, colleges and adult learning, children’s social care and local authority services for children.

The Smith Group (the Group) has been active since 2005, advising and guiding Ministers in successive administrations on education policy, enterprise in education and youth employment issues. The composition of the group is its strength, bringing together leading figures in business and education to bring fresh perspective to what is at once a challenge and an opportunity - how Scotland can best prepare its young people to make effective contributions in their adult lives.

Website containing reports and studies on subjects such as social attitudes, education, housing, childhood and child poverty.

The high level of young people who are NEET – not in employment, education or training – is one of the most serious social problems facing the country. There are currently an estimated 979,000 16-24 year NEETs in England. This represents 16 per cent of this age group. 186,000 of these young people are aged 16-18. This snapshot analysis is the first paper produced as part of a research partnership between The Work Foundation and the Private Equity Foundation. It investigates the geography of NEETS, focusing on the 53 largest towns and cities in Great Britain.