education

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed.

This Insight focuses on the transition to adulthood for young people with autistic spectrum disorder.

Document that builds on the strategic framework for 2011-14 by setting key outcomes to support innovation in priority areas of our business.

On the 4 June 2013, eight Scottish universities involved in the Scottish Inter-University Social Work Service User and Carers’ Network, supported by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS), collaborated to produce the first national service user and carer conference aimed at highlighting the importance of involving people who have experience of using social work and/or health services in the education of social workers and other professionals.

Understanding Glasgow sets out to describe the city and its people. The website aims to create an accessible resource that will inform a wide audience about issues of importance to Glasgow's population (e.g. health, poverty, education, environment, etc) and that will illustrate trends, make comparisons both within the city and with other cities, allow progress to be monitored and encourage discussion and engagement about the future of the city.

This paper investigates the nature and extent of the problems facing the children’s social work profession. Last year, there were around 1,350 vacant jobs in this field, many of which were concentrated in certain areas. Despite a concerted effort to tackle this shortage of workers, there are widespread concerns about the skills, competencies and calibre of new recruits to the profession.

Annual report of NHS Education for Scotland, a Health Board providing quality education for a healthier Scotland.

The way that public services are organised and work has changed considerably over the last 25 years. One of the main changes has been to divide the function of public agencies into service purchasers which ‘commission’ or ‘purchase’ services on behalf of the public and service providers which provide the services. This change has been introduced across all public sectors in many different countries. The broad aim of this research was to identify research evidence on ‘commissioning’ or ‘public service purchasing’ in education, health and/or social welfare in the UK and other countries.