economic development

This collection of three Viewpoints responds to work by the Fabian Society and Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) that looks at attitudes towards economic inequality and how to tackle it, and the political debate around it.

Response of the Scottish Homelessness and Employability Network to the Scottish Government discussion paper of June 2008 on their policies to reduce poverty in Scotland.

National guidance from the Scottish Government on legislation, policies and practices to prevent and resolve homelessness. It provides practical guidance on how the legislation and related policies should be implemented.

It supports our objective that homeless people receive readily accessible services tailored to their needs.

In 2008, JRF published the first ‘minimum income standard for Britain’, based on what members of the public thought people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. A year later, and in changing economic circumstances, the standard has been updated for inflation. This study updates 2008’s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.

This study aims to increase understanding of how politicians think and talk about economic inequality, both in private and in public. It compares politicians' attitudes across and between five major political parties: the Conservatives, Labour, the Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru, and the Scottish National Party. The research is particularly relevant given the recent turbulence with the financial system, the correspondingly high levels of attention upon the City and bonus culture, and the recession.

This paper examines the implications of increasing migration to rural areas, looking in particular at the economics of this phenomenon. We explore the roles migrants are playing, the economic impacts of migration on existing populations and businesses, and what future migratory trends might be. In particular, we consider whether recent migration to rural Britain has led to any risks for rural economies; and if so, how these risks can be managed.

This report takes a fresh look at the ways in which migration affects development in Jamaica. It maps out how much migration Jamaica is experiencing, and what that migration looks like, asking: who moves, why, where to, and for how long?