offenders

What works: youth justice

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research Into Practice workshops, this podcast details a talk by Professor Fergus McNeill on the range of practices and procedures for dealing with young people involved, or at risk of being involved, in offending. The event was held on Friday, 5th February 2010.

Prisons; Sex culture (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments, the first on prisons. Laurie Taylor visits England’s oldest prison, the Tower of London, to talk to ex-prison governor and criminologist, Professor David Wilson, about a new project whose aim is to bring fans of prison drama into contact with penal experts and reformers.

Young people, and gun and knife crime: a review of the evidence

This is the outcome of an extensive review of evidence about the effectiveness of interventions designed to tackle children and young people's involvement in gun and knife crime. It discusses predicting who is most likely to be involved in violent crime, the impact of where children and young people live on their involvement, how young people's relationships, perceptions and choices affect involvement, anti-gun and anti-knife interventions, and youth offending and youth violence research, ending with conclusions.

Restorative Justice (Diversion) services monitoring and evaluation report 2006/07

Report assessing the performance of Sacro's Restorative Justice Diversion from Prosecution services. It identifies areas of service delivery which could be improved and asks what the key messages about the services are.

Inside out : the case for improving mental healthcare across the criminal justice system

Report describing the obstacles to court diversion schemes for offenders with mental health problems in England and Wales and arguing that early and more structured interventions by the health care and justice systems would improve care and reduce the cost of crime. It identifies examples of good practice in this area in England and Wales and points to the potential of a new model in mental health courts.

Mental Health (Public Safety and Appeals) (Scotland) Act 1999

The purpose of this Act of the Scottish Parliament is to add public safety to the grounds for not discharging certain patients detained under the Mental Health (Scotland) Act 1984; to provide for appeal against the decision of the sheriff on applications by these patients for their discharge; and to amend the definition of 'mental disorder' in that Act.

How unwanted acts become crimes (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the way in which unwanted acts can become crimes. The relationship between levels of crime and fear of crime continues to exercise academics and policy makers alike. The question is asked if soaring prison populations accurately reflect the former or the latter. Laurie Taylor is joined by Nils Christie, Professor of Criminology at the University of Oslo, who argues that crime is a product of cultural, social and mental processes.

Criminal Procedure (Amendment) (Scotland) Act 2002

This Act of Scottish Parliament covers intermediate diets and how they relate to arrest warrants. An intermediate diet is a hearing set by a court, in summary criminal proceedings, for the purpose of ascertaining, so far as is reasonably practicable, whether the case is likely to proceed to trial on the date assigned as a trial diet. If an accused does not appear as required for an intermediate diet, the court may grant a warrant for his or her arrest.

A new paradigm for social work with offenders?

This short paper briefly summarises the case for the development of a new paradigm for social work with offenders drawn from reviews of 'desistance' research that is, from studies that explore the processes by which offenders stop offending.