offenders

ISMS was launched in Glasgow, and six other Phase One sites, in April 2005, in order to provide a direct community-based alternative to secure care.

The purpose of this report is twofold. Firstly it comprises a short examination of the service, covering the period from 1st April 2007 to 31st March 2009 (following on from where the previous evaluation left off).

The study involved an examination of practices for checking the nationality and migrant status of arrestees in a sample of custody suites in England and Wales in 2006/07.

The study also involved the piloting of enhanced checking processes in four custody suites. The aim was to examine the use of immigration powers when dealing with foreign national (FN) arrestees and whether this could be expanded and improved.

The report evaluates the range and effectiveness of the arrangements for education and training for several categories of young people: those identified for their likelihood of offending; young offenders who move into custodial establishments then are transferred between different establishments while in custody; and those who move between custody and the community. The report illustrates good practice and makes recommendations for improvement.

Pilot Drug Courts were introduced in October 2001 in Glasgow and in August 2002 in Fife. Following broadly positive evaluations of the pilot schemes in 2006, Scottish Ministers agreed to continue funding the Drug Courts for a further 3 years until Spring 2009. The purpose of this review is to assess the impact and effectiveness of the two Drug Courts, including cost effectiveness, in light of the impact of the summary justice reforms.

The purpose of this report is to provide a literature review on desistance from crime which is intended to open up suggested lines of enquiry which the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) might then pursue in its policy programme - specifically its emerging work on offender engagement.

Scottish Government website on reducing reoffending, which contains information on dealing with offenders, projects and initiatives, key partners, publications and legislation, and news and events.

Report of a study which aimed to describe and critically appraise the procedures followed by the National Probation Service to identify and intervene with offenders who have alcohol problems.

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research Into Practice workshops, this podcast details a talk by Professor Fergus McNeill on the range of practices and procedures for dealing with young people involved, or at risk of being involved, in offending. The event was held on Friday, 5th February 2010.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments, the first on prisons. Laurie Taylor visits England’s oldest prison, the Tower of London, to talk to ex-prison governor and criminologist, Professor David Wilson, about a new project whose aim is to bring fans of prison drama into contact with penal experts and reformers.