offenders

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on electronic tagging. In the summer of 2005, the UK Home Secretary, David Blunkett, announced the expansion of tagging schemes for offenders which was predicted to lead to an increase in the number that are tagged and the introduction of satellite tagging.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at ways in which to help families who have been affected by the imprisonment of a family member. The charity, Action for Families, is co-ordinating 'family relationship workshops' in prisons. At Ashwell Prison near Leicester, wives and partners come together with male prisoners to spend a day thinking through some of the problems they may face. Caroline Swinburne joins Theresa Oldman of Relate.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on juvenile offending and looks at a new study which brings up to date the stories of fifty men first encountered as boys in an American reform school in the 1950s.

Laurie Taylor meets Professor John Laub to find out what the boys' subsequent biographies have to tell us about a widely accepted linkage between juvenile offending and long-term criminal careers. The segment is second in the audio clip after a segment on dirt and cleanliness.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on criminal policy transfer in view of criminals who increasingly operate across national boundaries and so apparently do ideas of criminal justice.

Laurie Taylor talks to criminologist, Professor Tim Newburn, and considers the claim that crime control policies here and in the United States are converging. The segment is second in the audio clip after a look at economies of design.

Paper describing the Victim Statement (VS) scheme which was piloted in Ayr, Edinburgh and Kilmarnock between 2003 and 2005.

The scheme aimed to allow crime victims to make a statement about the impact of the offence on their lives once a decision to prosecute had been taken.

The paper also examines the practicalities of implementing the scheme more widely.

The Home Office's Restorative Justice web page outlines the Government's Restorative Justice Strategy. Restorative justice provides an opportunity for victims, offenders and sometimes representatives of the community to communicate about an offence and how to repair the harm caused. Victim participation is always voluntary, and offenders need to have admitted some responsibility for the harm they have caused.

The Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance (SIAA) promotes, supports and defends the principles and practice of independent advocacy across Scotland. This newsletter provides an update on the progress of the SIAA and includes information about the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000, as well as the International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership Exchange, which looked at advocacy, recovery and peer support. There are also details about a forensic mental health initiative which develops services for Mentally Disordered Offenders.

This guidance sets out how organisations and individuals - including police, teachers, social workers and health workers - should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people from sexual exploitation.

It aims to help agencies to: develop local preventive strategies; identify those at risk of being sexually exploited, to safeguard those who are being sexually exploited; and to identify and prosecute perpetrators. A chapter on the roles and responsibilities of agencies is included.

These statistics have been gathered together from various official and non-government sources to paint a picture of the treatment and experiences of women within the Criminal Justice System.

This includes women in their roles as offenders, victims of crime, suspects and as employees/practitioners within criminal justice agencies. Under section 95 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 it is the duty of the Secretary of State [for Justice] to publish this information in an effort to avoid discrimination of any kind and at any stage within the system.

This site provides an access point to information relating to all civil and criminal courts within Scotland, including the Court of Session, the High Court of Justiciary, the Sheriff Courts and a number of other courts, commissions and tribunals as well the District Courts.

The information includes location details, contact numbers, advice and details of recent significant judgements. The site also provides information about some parts of the Scottish Executive Justice Department.