offenders

Since 2006, all Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) have had the lead role for commissioning health services in the criminal justice system. This brief guide sets out 10 questions Primary Care Trust (PCT) board members can ask to find out how well their PCT is serving prisoners and community sentenced offenders in the area of mental health care.

Paper summarising data collated from the MAPPA annual reports published in each of the 42 areas of England and Wales.

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This unit examines what a crime is; how we as a society define 'crime'; the steps that lead from a crime to a conviction, and the factors that may affect that process.

This report published by the Beckley Foundation Drug Policy Programme in partnership with the International Centre for Prison Studies at Kings College London, revisits the topic of the incarceration of drug offenders [IDPC, UK].

Most governments make strong statements about the need to maintain, and often increase, police activity and penal sanctions for drug users. This approach, it was claimed, is based on the idea that strong enforcement, and widespread incarceration, will deter potential users and dealers from becoming involved in the illegal drug market.

The toolkits in this resource provide consolidated and comprehensive guidance covering the main areas of crime and criminality. They have been developed by a range of practitioners and policy makers from government, police, local authorities, voluntary groups and others.

Report containing the findings of a large survey of prisoners with learning disabilities and difficulties, examining their experiences of the criminal justice system, discussing the over-arching themes which emerged and making recommendations for change.

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused or revealed by criminal behaviour. It is best accomplished through cooperative processes that include all stakeholders. Restorative justice theory and programs have emerged over the past 20 years as an increasingly influential world-wide alternative to criminal justice practice. This tutorial provides an overview of the movement and of the issues that it raises.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. In the first Laurie Taylor speaks to Dr Laura Piacentini about her new research on imprisonment in Russia which took her to prison colonies where she lived, shared vodka with the prison officers and listened to recitations of Alexander Pushkin's poetry. There, she discovered that contrary to expectations, the Russian penal system allowed prisoners certain freedoms denied them in British jails.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on electronic tagging. In the summer of 2005, the UK Home Secretary, David Blunkett, announced the expansion of tagging schemes for offenders which was predicted to lead to an increase in the number that are tagged and the introduction of satellite tagging.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at ways in which to help families who have been affected by the imprisonment of a family member. The charity, Action for Families, is co-ordinating 'family relationship workshops' in prisons. At Ashwell Prison near Leicester, wives and partners come together with male prisoners to spend a day thinking through some of the problems they may face. Caroline Swinburne joins Theresa Oldman of Relate.