Lives sentenced. Experiences of repeated punishment

Little is known about the effects of repeated imprisonment. Very few research studies have examined how those who are punished by the criminal justice system experience and interpret their sentences. Research that does exist, like my PhD, has largely focused on one single sentence. But people who have served many sentences (in other words, who have long punishment careers), are likely not to experience criminal punishments in isolation, but in the context of their wider lives and previous sentences.

Mental health of women detained by the criminal courts

One of the ways in which the Commission monitors individuals' care and treatment is through the visits programme. It visits individuals in a range of settings throughout Scotland: at home, in hospital or in any other setting such as prisons where care and treatment is being delivered.

This report details findings from visits between May and September 2013 to 51 women who met the above criteria and makes a number of recommendations in response to these findings.

Inquiry into purposeful activity in prisons (5th report, 2013 - Session 4)

The Justice Committee believes that the effective rehabilitation of offenders is vital in order to reduce crime levels, reduce the economic and social costs of crime and help create a safer Scotland. It also enables those individuals who have offended, for a variety of reasons, to choose a better life for themselves, their families and communities.

Offenders peer interventions: what do we know?

Very little is currently known about the practice of using offenders as peer mentors. This study seeks to begin to address this gap in our knowledge and has four key objectives: • to develop the evidence-base regarding the practice of using offenders in peer mentoring roles • to establish what works (and what does not) • to identify the individual and wider benefits and how these can be maximised in future provision • to develop principles of 'best practice'.