criminal justice, law and rights

Online journal including presentations by Rob Allen, Kathleen Marshall and original articles by Michele Burman on the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, by Jenny Johnstone and Vivian Leacock on Managing equality in the criminal justice process, and by Simon Mackenzie on game theory and the evolution of cooperation in criminal justice policy.

Literature review that aims to address a gap in our knowledge base around what the public think and feel about the justice system and why, and what consequences this has for the system itself.

Briefing paper that has been prepared for criminal justice, healthcare and legal professionals and practitioners, members of the judiciary, and local government directors of adult and children’s services and lead members in England and Wales.

It will be of particular use to those working in liaison and diversion services in England and criminal justice liaison services in Wales; magistrates; defence lawyers and court staff.

Official launch of the Report of the Commission on Women Offenders by Rt Hon Professor Dame Elish Angiolini QC DBE, Chair of the Commission on Women Offenders.

Paper that looks at features of the criminal justice systems in operation in the Netherlands and Germany and analyses changes in prison numbers in order to see whether any lessons might usefully be considered in England and Wales.

There is a particular focus on Germany and the Netherlands as these are countries which share certain similarities with the UK.

The Scottish Government’s Making Justice Work Programme represents the most significant set of reforms to courts for more than a century. A central objective of the programme is to improve the experience of victims and witnesses, and a commitment has been made to to bring forward a Victims and Witnesses Bill during this Parliament.

Report that begins by considering how the female prison population has increased, why this has happened and what the consequences have been. This is followed by a review of the way the Labour government sought to reduce the number of women going to prison and the very limited impact its policies had in practice.

The report concludes by considering what the current government has achieved during its first two years in office; and what changes might be needed if the number of women entering prison is really to fall.

The Hate Crimes Project will present new Scottish research on concepts of “hate” crime. It will also provide short summaries, discussion and artwork from multimedia projects.

The site is partially funded by a grant from the Royal Society of Edinburgh and at present it contains links and findings from research carried out, some with colleagues, funded by the RSE, the Clark Foundation and the Scottish Centre for Criminal Justice Research, all of whose support is gratefully acknowledged.