rights

This guide is a simple audit tool that can be used by children and young people to help them assess the safeguarding activities of the organisations they use. Developed by a group of children and young people, Kidscheck is a companion publication to Stopcheck . It is designed to enable children and young people to assess how well their club or activity group is doing in keeping them safe and happy. Kidscheck can be used with a variety of age groups.

These Rules permit legal representatives to attend Children's Hearings in certain circumstances. They also specify when the Children's Hearing may consider the appointment of a legal representative, and the circumstances in which an appointment may be made.

They authorise the Principal Reporter to make copies of the relevant documentation available to legal representatives and also specifies groups of persons from whom a legal representative may be appointed.

Being poor in the United Kingdom can mean being subjected to discrimination on the grounds of poverty. Both poverty and discrimination are contrary to the spirit and the terms of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights. Damian Killeen argues that the refusal of successive governments to incorporate the International Covenant of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights into UK law has compounded common social attitudes that denigrate people who experience poverty and that undermine popular support for policies to eradicate poverty.

Report highlighting the benefits that investment in legal services targeted at young people can bring. These include cutting the numbers of young people not in education, employment or training and reducing the likelihood of young people offending.

There are sets of rules (called National Minimum Standards) which say how children should be looked after in each main sort of social care service for children. There are standards for the different sorts of places where children might live away from their first home. They are used by inspectors from Ofsted when they visit to check that children are being looked after properly. Children and parents can also look at them to see what should and shouldn’t be happening in places where children are being looked after.

Report of the Disability Working Group and Executive Response. The report of the Disability Working Group sets out their recommendations for the Scottish Executive, local authorities, employers, educators, community care providers etc. Recommendations in the report provide both an agenda for immediate action and a platform to build onto improve equality for disabled people in Scotland.

This feasibility study sought to examine how best to conceptualise and evaluate how decision-making in children’s lives takes due account of their views, with particular attention to processes related to Part I of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 and the implications for compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000. It set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (including Asperger’s syndrome) to lead a full life, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

Part of the Citizens Advice Bureau AdviceGuide website. It contains information on the rights of children and young people in Scotland. in particular on discrimination, proof of age, punishment, religion and voting.

This learning object is suitable for use in conjunction case studies once students have appreciated the basic framework of the legal rules. These materials raise awareness of: the complexity of the relationship between law and social work in practice; the breadth of legal knowledge necessary for effective practice; the fact that law cannot be seen in isolation from values, and must be subject to critical analysis; how different options for practice balance legal rules, moral rules and individual and collective rights.