human rights

An audio and video based introduction to human rights. It charts the origins of human rights back to the United States Declaration of Independence and the French Revolution, setting the UK Human Rights Act 1998 in historical context. It also helps the learner distinguish between human rights and civil liberties.

Scottish Executive young people's guide to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Some of the 54 articles of the convention are listed and explained. The information provided applies only to Scotland.

In late summer of 2008, Young Scot was commissioned by the Scottish Government to seek the views of young people from across Scotland on what they thought about the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child's Concluding Observations relating to the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Right of the Child (UNCRC). The consultation explored the levels of awareness children and young people had regarding children's rights and their thoughts on which rights were most important for them, and for Scotland as a whole, to take action on.

This document examines the Court of Protection's health and welfare jurisdiction under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The new powers enable the court to make orders in relation to not only property and affairs but also personal welfare.

This resource provides guidance where a provider that is not a public authority provides a service to the public under contract to a public authority. That service needs to be provided in a way that takes account of the content of the Human Rights Act 1998. Providing a service in line with the Human Rights Act will assist in the provision of an optimized service. Not to do so may expose the public authority to legal liability and, furthermore, may infringe the legal rights of service users.

Demos is the think tank for everyday democracy. It believes everyone should be able to make personal choices in their daily lives that contribute to the common good.

Demos' aim is to put this democratic idea into practice by working with organisations in ways that make them more effective and legitimate. It focuses on six areas: public services; science and technology; cities and public space; people and communities; arts and culture; and global security.

The British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR) is an independent charity based in London which raises awareness and understanding about the importance of human rights.

It works for disadvantaged and vulnerable communities in the UK, seeking to ensure that the principles of equality, dignity and respect are incorporated into practice and policy at all levels of public service. The website includes details of programmes, events and training as well as FAQs and external web links.

Guide designed for officials in public authorities to assist them in working with the Human Rights Act 1998, which has been described as the most important piece of constitutional legislation passed in the United Kingdom since the achievement of universal suffrage in 1918.

The guide is short and simple and offers a brief introduction to human rights for use in straightforward situations.

More detailed guidance can be found in the human rights handbook for public officials, Human Rights and Human Lives, produced by the Department for Constitutional Affairs.

The Convention is made up of 50 articles which are given in full. The Convention clarifies and qualifies how all categories of rights apply to persons with disabilities and identifies areas where adaptations have to be made for persons with disabilities to effectively exercise their rights and areas where their rights have been violated, and where protection of rights must be reinforced.