sexual harassment

Childline video animation on the dangers of losing control in relationships.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people’s experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland, based on 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews conducted annually with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The results are presented in a series of reports including this one, which provides information on sexual victimisation and stalking.

The 2009/10 survey is the second sweep of the SCJS, with the first having been conducted in 2008/09.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring peoples’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The results for 2008-09 are presented in a series of reports including this one which provides information on stalking and sexual victimisation.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS)1 is a large-scale continuous survey measuring adults’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The Stop Violence Against Women website (STOPVAW) is a forum for information, advocacy and change. Minnesota Advocates for Human Rights developed this website as a tool for the promotion of women's human rights in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), Mongolia, and the U.N. Protectorate of Kosovo. STOPVAW was developed with support from and in consultation with the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) and the Open Society Institute's Network Women's Program.

10 minute drama about a 15 year old girl called Dee, who makes a common mistake of many teens and sends indecent photos of herself to her boyfriend Si. Without thinking of the consequences, Si sends the photos to a friend and very quickly the images become public.

A distressed Dee is helped through the situation by her alter-ego. Together they come to terms with the consequences of her actions and learn where to go for help and advice.